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Author Topic: Dr.Zatsarinin. AKA special/strange transformer.  (Read 4869 times)

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Dear All.

I have spent the best part of 13 years now, on and off, looking into the elements of OU. Back then the internet was in it's juvenile years and our dial up connection was like waiting for paint to dry, I do believe paint dried quicker !!  ;D

Last January I decided to get a little more involved and joined a couple of Forums. With I may add the usual "Newbie syndrome" !! Trying to participate but being shunned at the same time !! Not a nice feeling I can tell you !!

My first You tube here... https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=99FeKBi-Usg   and the follow up here... https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5ysJey7eS9A .

This transformer design shows some very interesting properties to me and I wondered if anyone else had done some experiments with it ??

As a close to this opening ?? I would like to thank ALL the members of OUR for accepting me here !!

Now to business !! What are your thoughts regarding this transformer ??

Cheers Grum.


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Hi Grum,  I'm not sure I got everything in your 2nd vid as I had too many distractions while watching it but first question is whether your ouput voltage is the same as input?   I'm sure you know almost any transformer will have more output current on a secondary if it has less windings than the input.  

Now having got that basic question out of the way I'll say I am very fascinated by a similar device I made which is a split copper pipe (a saw cut down one side the entire length) which is then covered with ferrite toroids the length of the pipe.   Then you run an insulated wire through the middle.   In my case the wire was about 6" long with a piece poking out each end.  The copper pipe has a wire soldered to each end but on opposite sides of the cut (note the cut is only on one side of the pipe so the wires are electrically still connected.   By inputting power to the two wires soldered on the pipe you can take power from the ends of the single wire running through the middle.   Looking at it this seems impossible but it works.  Just using the power from a signal generator I can brightly light an LED.   I think the video I saw of this showed it lighting tungsten filament bulbs also.   When I brought this up on another forum one of the usual naysayers wrote it off as just normal transformer action.   He might be right but it doesn't seem that way when you see it in action.   Pic below hopefully is clear enough to show this basic design.   The red and black wires are where you put power in and the single white wire (or even a nail as was shown in the video I saw) is where you take power out.   
   
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« Last Edit: 2014-01-10, 20:45:11 by wings »
   

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Hi Grum,  I'm not sure I got everything in your 2nd vid as I had too many distractions while watching it but first question is whether your ouput voltage is the same as input?   I'm sure you know almost any transformer will have more output current on a secondary if it has less windings than the input.  

Now having got that basic question out of the way I'll say I am very fascinated by a similar device I made which is a split copper pipe (a saw cut down one side the entire length) which is then covered with ferrite toroids the length of the pipe.   Then you run an insulated wire through the middle.   In my case the wire was about 6" long with a piece poking out each end.  The copper pipe has a wire soldered to each end but on opposite sides of the cut (note the cut is only on one side of the pipe so the wires are electrically still connected.   By inputting power to the two wires soldered on the pipe you can take power from the ends of the single wire running through the middle.   Looking at it this seems impossible but it works.  Just using the power from a signal generator I can brightly light an LED.   I think the video I saw of this showed it lighting tungsten filament bulbs also.   When I brought this up on another forum one of the usual naysayers wrote it off as just normal transformer action.   He might be right but it doesn't seem that way when you see it in action.   Pic below hopefully is clear enough to show this basic design.   The red and black wires are where you put power in and the single white wire (or even a nail as was shown in the video I saw) is where you take power out.   

Dear e2matrix.

Thanks for getting the ball rolling !! From memory the voltages are almost the same, in to out. Effectively a 1:1 ratio. The primary can be made from almost any conductive material I have tried a piece of Aluminium beer can to just another wire!!

With using a small power amplifier to drive the primary it was quite easy to light an incandescent bulb. As would be expected the transformers performance improved at it's resonance point.

I for one feel that a little more exhaustive research may find a use for this "Special" transformer.

Cheers Grum.


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Nanny state ? Left at the gate !! :)
   
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Grumage,

What you have there is a one turn transformer.

Did you know that when you mount a toroidal mains transformer into a metal
box, then you NEVER connect the center metal bolt to both sides of the
metal box? If you do then you have created a one turn short circuit loop
in the bolt and box that will load your transformer.

Have you tried to change your copper spiral to just a wire through the
core as shown in the attached drawing?

GL.
   
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http://www.overunityresearch.com/index.php?topic=229.0


Yes that is the guy I got the info from to build the one I made.   I guess it is essentially a one turn transformer but it's unusual in it's layout.   Ferrite is on the outside of everything with a wire running inside the copper pipe.   Odd to say the least.   
   
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Posts: 337
Yes that is the guy I got the info from to build the one I made.   I guess it is essentially a one turn transformer but it's unusual in it's layout.   Ferrite is on the outside of everything with a wire running inside the copper pipe.   Odd to say the least.   

e2matrix,

I do not see this transformer as odd. The only thing that matters is
that both your wire goes through the core in some way. Magnetic fields
is not shielded by copper. Think about a long Ferrite tube, insert a copper
tube and a wire inside the copper tube into the core. Now compress
the height of the tube, in your mind, and you get a one turn transformer.

GL.
   

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http://www.overunityresearch.com/index.php?topic=229.0


Dear wings.

Thank you for that reminder. This is probably the shortest thread ever !!  ;D

So I assume from the various remarks there is nothing out of the ordinary going on ?? And yes dear Groundloop I was aware of the bolt acting as a short I suppose the closest analogy would be the humble CT, current transformer.

Cheers Grum.


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Nanny state ? Left at the gate !! :)
   
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