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Author Topic: Dr. Stiffler returns with a new device: SFM  (Read 12923 times)

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What happens if you remove the clip lead which is loading the one inductor/LED and just let the inductors and Led be supported by e,g, a nylon fishing line to the LED?

If i let the circuit just lay on my bench,i have to raise the frequency to get the LED to light. If i hold it up by hand via one of the exposed wires,i have to lower the frequency to get the LED to light.
As we know,we are simply decreasing or increasing the size of the capacitance value,where the lower value would be just having the wire of the circuit it self as 1 plate(the other being ground of course),which would require a higher frequency,or having the larger plate,which would be myself holding the device,which would increase capacitance value,thus lowering the resonant frequency.

Quote
BTW, I suspect by now you have solved the mystery of the lighting neon from your other video. Have you?

Well kind of,although im still trying to understand as to how it causes this effect.
I can reproduce the effect,but as yet,do not fully understand as to how it can be this way--i.e,how current can flow in the circuit the way it was hooked up  ???

We'll come back to that one day,as it is quite interesting.
Bigger fish to fry ATM.  O0

Quote
If you salvage old CRT monitors or TV's for parts as I do, you will sometimes find on the small board on the neck of the CRT glass tubes that look exactly like a neon, but there is no neon gas in them, they are just spark gaps. Also things that look like small glass diodes will actually be tiny spark gaps. Typically though the protection is done with a plastic device with electrodes precisely spaced and a plastic cover over the body.

I use to salvage them all the time. The loops of copper wire around the monitor it self was ideal for the SSG pulse motors.
But they are getting harder to come across over here now.

Quote
There is a wealth of interesting components to be had by salvaging old CRT monitors, TV's laser printers etc. I use a heat gun to remove parts from the PCB quickly.

Yep,that is how i use to do it as well  O0
I now have a small blower nozzle that attaches to my soldering iron,driven from my compressor.
now i just get the solder to melting point,and hit the air nozzle trigger,and it blows the solder right out to a clean hole.


Brad


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Nice Video, Tinman :) :)

Well kind of,although im still trying to understand as to how it causes this effect.
I can reproduce the effect,but as yet,do not fully understand as to how it can be this way--i.e,how current can flow in the circuit the way it was hooked up  ???

IMHO your setup is displaying two different properties.
* First I believe the LED's are being lit by a phase-offset caused by the inductors.  Being in series, each inductor causes a current lag, leading to a voltage difference on the LED's.  One inductor may cause a 5deg lag and the other 30deg.
  You could confirm this by varying the frequency.  The brightness on the LED's should vary almost directly proportional to the frequency applied (technically a cosine proportion).   Find the peak brightness freq and go from there. 
  At 1/2 of the peak brightness freq, LED's will be half as bright.  At 1.5x peak brightness, LED's will be half as bright.  At 2x freq of peak brightness, the LED's will go out entirely.   This would be because the phase offset reached 180deg and there is no longer a differential across the leads.

* Second, the neon might be lit due to to HV flyback from the inductors.  The inductor flyback will briefly raise voltages to a high level from a ground-perspective, even though there is only a tiny differential between both inductors themselves.
  There is probably capacitive coupling as well, and you can verify the proportionality by switching between square and sine waves.  Dielectric coupling works best with impulses, so sine waves would drastically diminish the results at the same frequency.
  You can also try holding a scope probe near (BUT NOT TOUCHING) the lead.  Compare the scope readings between a lit and unlit neon.

With all these complex interactions, even the simplest circuits can be a complex puzzle to break down and fully understand.


Quote
I now have a small blower nozzle that attaches to my soldering iron,driven from my compressor.
now i just get the solder to melting point,and hit the air nozzle trigger,and it blows the solder right out to a clean hole.
Brilliant. O0
   
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Ran a quick test of the Stiffler diode LED test using a cheap LED lamp purchased at the Dollar Tree.  The circuit consisted of the LED array, 2-1N4148 diodes, a 330uH series inductor, Rigol DG4162 DDS generator, and Tek scope probes.  The resonant frequency with all scope probes connected was 2.277Mhz.

Scope pix and test pix are attached below.  CH1(yel) is the input voltage on the single wire from the generator, CH4(grn) is the current probe (that measured both the input current as well as the current thru the 1n4148 diodes on the output), CH3(pnk) and CH2(blu) are the differential probes to measure the voltage difference across the diode array, and the Math(red) channel shows the input and output power levels.

Regards,
Pm
   
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'Lightbulb moment' literally...
Partzman, you've just reminded me of the stock of those bulbs we got a while back for the house. Here was me wondering about the Cree and something similar is sat in the kitchen drawer !
 O0


I decided to have a go at Brad's method.
The inductors are regular wound types, 2 different values. It didn't work with the sig gen, but does work with a SWES (Simple Wireless Electricity System).
15 turns bifilar pancake, S9014, diode from battery negative to Emitter, 1.5V AAA
It's kind of neat how no trailing wire or clip lead is needed and it stands up on the coil.
Just simply a fun 5 minute build and i've learned something new from it already. Can't say fairer than that, cheers Brad.

Edit - Just reminded myself that it's similar to the method that Iluzyon1 showed a few years ago. He had just 1 inductor and the LED goes on top.
In my videos on the table, you might have seen a diorama in the background. That's "The Wireless Town", where anything can be placed anywhere and lights up, plus motors can turn and etc, a sort of flea circus thing for wireless power.
The street lamps are built to that single inductor method, housed in black painted thin straws.
Here's one sitting on the same SWES.


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  Interesting - PM and Mark! 
TK - there must be a Tesla coil or something outside of the view of the video cam in that first vid (the only one i looked at) - right?

PM:  "...using a cheap LED lamp purchased at the Dollar Tree."
   Hmmmm...  could you be specific about this LED lamp?  besides that it cost a dollar?   ^-^
   
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  Interesting - PM and Mark! 
TK - there must be a Tesla coil or something outside of the view of the video cam in that first vid (the only one i looked at) - right?

PM:  "...using a cheap LED lamp purchased at the Dollar Tree."
   Hmmmm...  could you be specific about this LED lamp?  besides that it cost a dollar?   ^-^

Yes, the box specs say 120v, 60W equivalent, 8W actual with 800 lumens.  It is distributed by Greenbrier Intl and manufactured in China of course.  There are 11 leds verses 10 in Dr. Stiffler's Cree and at 60vdc, the LED array draws ~20ma.  It is hard to tell from the pix but the LED brightness is far from full intensity by a looong shot!  I do have the instruments to measure luminance but the significance is questionable due to LED output variations between DC and pulsed or high frequency.  This can be accounted for with the proper manufacturers specs but in this case we have none.

I might add that the output current measurement was taken at the minimum range of the TCP0020 current probe so I would guess the accuracy could be in the +/- 20% range or so.

Regards,
Pm
   

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  Interesting - PM and Mark! 
TK - there must be a Tesla coil or something outside of the view of the video cam in that first vid (the only one i looked at) - right?

PM:  "...using a cheap LED lamp purchased at the Dollar Tree."
   Hmmmm...  could you be specific about this LED lamp?  besides that it cost a dollar?   ^-^

Please watch the other two videos. The astute observer will see the applicability to what Stiffler has been showing and claiming. RF oscillators, transmission lines, tuned circuits, filters, etc. along with some mad construction skills and theoretical knowledge that Stiffler will probably never have. Hint: Henry has actually surgically inserted tiny SMD inductors, caps and resistors into the 5mm LED packages themselves.

The Dollar Tree LED bulbs are 60 watt-equivalent, branded Sylvania or unbranded, warm white, non-dimmable, 800 Lumens. I have about a dozen of them.


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I ran these two sims  while back, no need for me to post any more details as the operation has been quite well explained.

In the first case there is a 10kHz difference in resonance between self resonant tanks.

In the second, we have identical tanks but one is loaded with extra capacity to source.

So:

To light a LED lamp you will need:

An LED Lamp
An expensive HF signal generator or stand alone  discrete oscillator design that can output several watts
A resonant coil or two

However, I have it from private information that  Stiffler will probably be boiling his circuit down even further, eliminating all inductive components and oscillators. See the SFS,  Stiffler Final Secret revealed here.

ION,

I'm sorry but your 3rd circuit showing Dr. Stiffler's final secret will never work!  It is obvious to the most casual observer that the photons from the LED are directed away from the source V1 and therefore this circuit will only drain the battery over time.  If you simply re-position the LED to direct those photons toward V1, the problem is solved.  :D

Regards,
Pm

Edit: It should also be noticed that your LED only emits 2 photons so I recommend you change suppliers to Superior Optical Stuff (SOS) and acquire the latest in high photonic output devices.
   
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Was the information gained from 3 sources familiar with the matter ?
That always works for the mainstream media :)


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Was the cleaning lady in the movie ?  :-\

Yes, just tried that complex circuit and it blew the main house fuse. Also set alight several cars 2 streets away and none right next door. A very strange phenomenon, like half of each car was burnt and not the other half...have seen that somewhere before. Oh and the local high rise office building simply fell down on itself.
Maybe that's why such circuits aren't allowed into society. I'd bet that if they are, they're surrounded in plastic to hide them.





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If Stiffler had read Eric Dollard's 'Crystal Radio Initiative' he would probably have a better understanding about the circuits he is building.  ;D

(Unless of course I'm completely misinterpreting the effects)
« Last Edit: 2018-06-02, 01:53:47 by Reiyuki »
   
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  Well, reading this all gave me a hearty laugh - good fun. 
All kidding aside - there may be some learning at the core here.   O0
   
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 O0



Ah wait wait Reiyuki - my Ground outside now is a 7ft copper tube laying sideways about 3ft down. I built that rig that Eric was discussing and have 4x steel and copper rods in a 50ft square. The idea, is to use 2 of them at opposite sides as wireless energy Grounds. So yes, i'd say it's related
:)


Now speaking of learning, i'd like to know if something is right.
It's mathematics  :-\
Overview is that the Doc is using approx 13.5MHz to drive his Cree board and noone seems to have a sig gen that goes that high. Nor do we have anything that can run the frequency at 20V.
So, using the old H2Grow crystal oscillator circuit, i've got a 13.4MHz crystal running - Pierce design.
That output will then feed a MOSFET Gate, which switches the power from a cheap Chinese voltage booster, to get the 20V.
Most MOSFETs top out at 10MHz and it's of course too slow.
Checking the specs of A49T N-channels which I have, they seem to be fast enough when looking at the datasheet: http://www.aosmd.com/pdfs/datasheet/AO3404.pdf
I'm looking at the Turn-ON Delay, Rise, Fall and equiv Turn-Off times. All of which totals approx 25ns.
Using this handy site for nanoseconds to MHz: https://www.unitjuggler.com/convert-frequency-from-MHz-to-ns(p).html?val=13.4  I get 75ns as the frequency speed needed or bettered for 13.4Mhz.
So that says the A49T(also known as AO3404) should work ?
Gate Threshold appears to be around 1.8V, but am not sure if am reading it right.

Here's the scope shot of the less than stellar cleanliness, will that switch it anyway ?:




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Hi Slider,

Your 13.4 Mhz oscillator waveform needs some 'cleaning' to get rid of the two peaks in the positive halfwaves that may trigger your proposed MOSFET switch twice during the positive halfwaves. To do the 'cleaning', just make the coil in the collector (if there is a coil there, lol, there should be) somehow tuneable if possible.  But wait,

 You could 'crank up' the oscillator amplitude for 'free' by using a tapped tank circuit whereby the collector would be connected to a coil tap so that only 25-30% of the full coil turns would be between the collector and the positive rail and a tuning capacitor would be connected across the full coil to tune it to 13.4 MHz. Of course you would need to tinker with the coil full inductance to bring it to resonate with say a 50 pF to 100 pF variable or trimmer cap or just with a 40 pF trimmer cap. To do this you would need about a 4 uH coil tapped around a quarter part of its full number of turns. (Maybe you have an L meter?)

This way you should have ample peak to peak sine wave voltage across the coil in the order of 10, 15 or 20 Vpp (depends on the Q of the tank and the supply voltage) and of course the capacitive loading nature of Dr Stiffler's circuit as a whole should not appear as a heavy load to the 'hot point' of the LC tank where the other end wire of the coil and the other end of the tuning cap is tied together and is otherwise left 'floating'. If the capacitive loading nature of the Stiffler circuit pulls the LC tank from the crystal resonance, then you can retune the tank by the variable or the trimmer capacitor, watching the waveform on the scope across the coil.

Gyula

Edit to add: if the Dr Stiffler circuit loads down the LC tank amplitude heavily or kills oscillations then you could use your proposed MOSFET amplifier, wiil try to help if needed. 
   
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Ah wait wait Reiyuki - my Ground outside now is a 7ft copper tube laying sideways about 3ft down. I built that rig that Eric was discussing and have 4x steel and copper rods in a 50ft square. The idea, is to use 2 of them at opposite sides as wireless energy Grounds. So yes, i'd say it's related :)

Using different metals as grounding materials, I'd say that has a lot of potential (pun intended) ^-^.
If you're going that route, I'd also consider using 'battery' matals from the galvanic series (we're trying to make an earth battery, right?).  Nickel+Iron, Zinc+Copper, etc.
So many possible experiments, never enough time.  :-\

Quote
Now speaking of learning, i'd like to know if something is right.
Overview is that the Doc is using approx 13.5MHz to drive his Cree board and noone seems to have a sig gen that goes that high. Nor do we have anything that can run the frequency at 20V.
So, using the old H2Grow crystal oscillator circuit, i've got a 13.4MHz crystal running - Pierce design.
That output will then feed a MOSFET Gate, which switches the power from a cheap Chinese voltage booster, to get the 20V.
Most MOSFETs top out at 10MHz and it's of course too slow.
Checking the specs of A49T N-channels which I have, they seem to be fast enough when looking at the datasheet: http://www.aosmd.com/pdfs/datasheet/AO3404.pdf
I'm looking at the Turn-ON Delay, Rise, Fall and equiv Turn-Off times. All of which totals approx 25ns.
Using this handy site for nanoseconds to MHz: https://www.unitjuggler.com/convert-frequency-from-MHz-to-ns(p).html?val=13.4  I get 75ns as the frequency speed needed or bettered for 13.4Mhz.
So that says the A49T(also known as AO3404) should work ?
Gate Threshold appears to be around 1.8V, but am not sure if am reading it right.

Here's the scope shot of the less than stellar cleanliness, will that switch it anyway ?:

Unfortunately I'm not the expert for MOSFETs (still learning the quirks of it myself).  I do now know that using a driver helps IMMENSELY.  FETs like to be fully on or fully off.  Driving them manually is  causes increased dissipation in the FET (same as driving them too fast).  Mark Snoswell had some good advice here and on OU as to driver and FET selection:
https://overunity.com/3544/materials-parts-and-data/msg56820/#msg56820
https://overunity.com/2872/eldarion-and-bruces-build-of-bobs-energy-converter/msg58345/#msg58345

Best advice I can give is: use a good MOSFET driver at the highest voltage allowed by the FET and driver, and minimize wire length and inductance on the control circuitry.  That should at least get you in the ballpark (roughly where I am).
I'm not sure the AO3404 is a good choice.  At 30v a BEMF spike from even a mildly inductive load is going to smoke it fast.  IRF820 seems to be the industry standard for a lot of people here.

Have fun Slider O0

--------------------------------------

As for Stiffler's latest videos:  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=On_ynVaUGHM
I wish he would vary the tuning on his function generator so we can start to isolate the components and action within his circuit.

* Switching between Square and Sine waves will diminish or amplify the capacitive coupling.  If the LED's dim switching to sine waves, that would tell you dielectric coupling plays a large role in the effect.
* Dielectric coupling often shows up as tight bands in a circuit.  Adjusting the frequency away a few percent would show 'ripples' if the effect is largely dielectric.
* Phase-angle offsets  (caused by time-delay between two inductors like in Tinman's circuit) should decline an almost linear to the frequency applied.  1/2 frequency and the LED's should be 1/2 as bright (if the effect is largely inductive).  This is because 90deg offset represents the peak phase difference, so 1/2 frequency should be roughly 1/2 brightness (a 45deg offset).  2x frequency should be a 180deg offset and the inductive effects should cancel (predominantly dielectric components would remain).
« Last Edit: 2018-06-04, 04:05:45 by Reiyuki »
   

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 author=Slider2732 link=topic=3628.msg68118#msg68118 date=1528046856]
 



Quote
Overview is that the Doc is using approx 13.5MHz to drive his Cree board and noone seems to have a sig gen that goes that high. Nor do we have anything that can run the frequency at 20V.

I do.
20MHz @ 20VPP.

Just to busy with the other project ATM.


Brad


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  Yesterday, I set up an experiment following TinMan's basic circuit:  a signal generator with just the signal wire connected to two small inductors  (680uH and 820 uH = what I used) - see photo below.  Then each of these were applied to a 120V LED bulb. 

As I varied the frequency, I was a bit surprised to see the bulb light up (it is a red+blue LED bulb) at a very sharp frequency... right around 1.98MHz.  It was necessary for me to hold the bulb as shown, so somehow I was part of the circuit (probably capacitative coupling).

  Playing with this for just a few minutes, changing the wave form and the frequency (running at 20V), the poor sig-gen failed... sigh!  The screen just flashes light, no data displayed anymore...  But I could see that it worked, and I'm not giving up on this approach... Just need a more robust signal-generator, I think.  (Any suggestions?)
   

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Buy me some coffee
  Yesterday, I set up an experiment following TinMan's basic circuit:  a signal generator with just the signal wire connected to two small inductors  (680uH and 820 uH = what I used) - see photo below.  Then each of these were applied to a 120V LED bulb. 

As I varied the frequency, I was a bit surprised to see the bulb light up (it is a red+blue LED bulb) at a very sharp frequency... right around 1.98MHz.  It was necessary for me to hold the bulb as shown, so somehow I was part of the circuit (probably capacitative coupling).

  Playing with this for just a few minutes, changing the wave form and the frequency (running at 20V), the poor sig-gen failed... sigh!  The screen just flashes light, no data displayed anymore...  But I could see that it worked, and I'm not giving up on this approach... Just need a more robust signal-generator, I think.  (Any suggestions?)

I would say that-along with those two inductors,and the inductive circuit inside the bulb,you sent high voltage inductive spikes back into your sig gen,and fried it.

The SG i have is quite robust,and was less that 300 AU dollars from ebay.
It will pump out 200mA at 20v.


Brad


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It's turtles all the way down
I have that exact generator but have not had any problems with it........yet.

Maybe a good idea to buffer these experiments.


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That's a really good thought  ???
Would a simplified buffer for purely protection be a signal diode and an NPN transistor ?


A very kind subscriber on Youtube had a similar thought about signal generators and decided I should build a capable one..keeping the result. It's AD9850 based as the signal generator, that ties to an Arduino and a 1602 2 line display. They go as high as 70MHz for sine wave and are 10/14 bit resolution devices.
Total cost is about $35, but they do have to be built from the parts.
There is the large problem with such a solution of the output needing to be ramped up to 20V, otherwise it's something tiny like 2V. 
 

Good progress with running the much more common 2 pin crystals.
I found a circuit by K5FOBS here:
http://jaunty-electronics.com/blog/2012/08/simple-oscillator-as-crystal-tester/
A very simple and effective circuit for driving practically any 2 pin crystal !!!
It works wonderfully.
Have tested loads of them and all work, with a clean wave output at the correct frequencies.

Video of it running and a crystal swap is shown:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2omcrkrrhoc
(2 mins 14 secs)


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    Hey, I really like that circuit and video, Mark! 
   
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 O0
It works really well. Have been desoldering and trying lots of different 2 pin crystals this evening. Even those tiny almost flat versions where the legs are underneath the body of them. All work, ranging from 1MHz to 30MHz, none need a retune of anything and all report their correct frequency.

Interestingly, my L3 coils seem to like 4.5MHz, showing best wireless range with crystals in that area...which means I need to retune them if wanting to run at ~13.5MHz !
As far as I understand the coil tuning, for higher resonance turns are taken off, to lower the resonance turns are added ?


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It's turtles all the way down
O0
It works really well. Have been desoldering and trying lots of different 2 pin crystals this evening. Even those tiny almost flat versions where the legs are underneath the body of them. All work, ranging from 1MHz to 30MHz, none need a retune of anything and all report their correct frequency.

Interestingly, my L3 coils seem to like 4.5MHz, showing best wireless range with crystals in that area...which means I need to retune them if wanting to run at ~13.5MHz !
As far as I understand the coil tuning, for higher resonance turns are taken off, to lower the resonance turns are added ?

Now with a stand alone circuit it should be easy to measure input power from e.g. a battery vs. light output and see what kind of overall efficiency you are getting.
« Last Edit: 2018-06-18, 12:45:39 by ion »


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I have tried severall aluminium backed led assemblies, from severall led bulbs, but non is able to give out
significant (what Dr. Stiffler shows) light when powered by a capacitivly coupled (copper foil to the back) FG.
Using 2x 1n4148 diodes as diode loop to the leds.


My Rigol DG4102 FG can supply a 20Vpp sine wave up to 20Mhz, but when using the red lead only to a series coil
(70 turns on a 16mm diameter former) to the copper (capactor) strip on the leds back, the voltage when tuning into
resonance (14Mhz in my case) drops to about 15Vpp pointing to a series resonance (low impedance) situation.

This 15vpp is only able to dimly light the leds, so any black box (solar cell inside) measurements is very
tricky (unstable) and yields only an equivalent DC input power of about 5mW or so.

Also adding a scope probe to the FG input will cause a deviation of the resonance frequency and light output as is when
adding the scope ground lead to the FG black lead etc.

Even clamping my current probe around the FG red lead causes frequency shifts etc.

Some rough measurements this way show about 100mW of input from the FG and the black box output shows only 5mW
of output, but even the slightest change around the setup will cause a strong deviation.

Using long wires between the 1n4148 diodes and the led asm. and between the coils and FG etc. is a must to get
some light, because when using an RF like setup (very short leads between components) will cause any light to
dissappear.

With other words, this setup is almost, if not completly, impossible to measure.

Itsu   
   
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