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Author Topic: Dr. Stiffler SEC circuits  (Read 68977 times)
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@all

Okay, first of all, the degree to which Dr Stiffler has been attacked personally in this thread is astounding.

As I mentioned on another thread, I have six SEC Exciters from early in Dr Stiffler's research which I purchased from him.  They have an interesting display of anomalous behavior, and are certainly not 'fake' as suggested by certain individuals.  I've tested them myself, and they appear to produce the effects displayed in Dr Stiffler's videos.
 
Groundloop, I will send you one if you want.  Just PM me.


@exnihiloest
Interesting results... what circuits / schematics did you use as a basis for your tests?  I want to make sure we are talking about the same phenomenon , and not just generic RF in megahertz range.  

Thanks,
Feynman
   

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I find myself in agreement with Farrah Day.

Some "see" what is not there.

This trait is not unique to Canada.


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"Truth: the most deadly weapon ever discovered by humanity. Capable of destroying entire perceptual sets, cultures, and realities. Outlawed by all governments everywhere. Possession is normally punishable by death." - John Gilmore (1935- ) Author
   
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@all

Okay, first of all, the degree to which Dr Stiffler has been attacked personally in this thread is astounding.

Feynman

Personally I'm astounded that you think he has been 'attacked'!  I think, like AC, you're over-reacting to comments born from real experience and interaction with Stiffler himself. Blimey it appears after all AC's input, he isn't even familiar with Stiffler, spatial coherence, or his SECs. I simply stated my experience with the guy. And from my experience with him, he can be quite arrogant, stupidly stubborn, and indeed not open to further debate or discussion. If that's your idea of a personal attack, you've got issues... or perhaps of course I'm just plying my trade as a misinfo Big Oil agent.  C.C

Some of you people really do need to wake up and get to grips with the real world, because it's nowhere near as warm and fluffy as many of you seem to think it is!
   
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I tried today to measure the output current to power my qartz-LED circuit (see http://www.overunityresearch.com/index.php?topic=718.msg12210#msg12210). The goal is to evaluate the transfer of energy between the generator and the load and to check if there is anomalous results.

I put a 10 Kohm resistance in series with the antenna and measure the HF voltages (for easiness, peak to peak values read from the oscilloscope) :
(1) at the output of the transmitter, there is 48v pp.
(2) after the 10 Kohm resistor (at the connection resistor-antenna), I measured 18v pp.
(3) when the frequency is tuned exactly on the quartz frequency, there is a drop of only 0.3v pp (17.7v pp at the antenna).

It means that around (48-18)/10= 3 mA pp current is permanently provided by the transmitter under voltage 48v, i.e. a power of 134 mW pp = 17 mW.
At the antenna, the voltage being 18v, the maximum available power is therefore 3*18=54 mW pp = 7mW (which is enough to light a LED).

But remember that 7 mW is still dissipated even when the frequency is not accorded with that of the quartz and the LED is not lit, because we have always around 18v at the antenna. I suppose it is absorbed by the environment. When well tuned, the voltage drops by 0.3v pp, meaning that an extra current of 0.3/10=0.03mA pp is consumed, which represents a power of 18*0.03=0.54 mW pp = 0,07 mW which is too weak to light a LED.

It follows that this measurement is not conclusive. The extra power that is provided when I tune the frequency on that of the quartz, is not enough to light a LED. But we can suppose that, when the frequency is well tuned, a part of the energy which was previously wasted in the environment, is now redirected to our resonant circuit. It is likely but I don't know how to be sure of that. An idea?

   

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Myself and Poynt discussed this earlier this evening.  It doesn't smell right to me at all.  I suspect that his "ground connection" is actually the power input, and the power source is another SEC off-screen.  It's possible that there may be psychological factors at play here.

Along the same lines, there is always the option to take fine magnet wire and route power to the device.  This will simply not be picked up by the camera.  I actually thought that's what Mylow was doing.  As we know, what he did was not done with fine electrical wires that couldn't be picked up by the camera, but it was done with fine fishing line that drove his rotors, and that couldn't (almost) be picked up by the camera.

This is not that far fetched.  I have seen some similar (but much weaker) results from some of my tests.  I have been down and out for a while now but give this a chance.  Lets see it mounted and replicated.
   
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Posts: 164
Quote
"The transistor the Doctor is using is not commercially available. The unit was designed in-cooperation with a semiconductor company to construct a unit that improved on the factors present in the MPSA06 that allows a Negative Resistance operation. These units are extremely expensive as the design and production of only one-thousand units for initial research was done. If the work is allowed to progress the transistors may go into a normal production mode by this company - although may be of limited number.

Some basic parms are the average unit has an hfe of 400-750 and a Vbe of as low as 0.17 volts. The units will display an equivalent negative resistance of 0.7 ohm for a voltage of 8.5 volts. As the Doctor states one should stay tuned to what may be coming and again conditions can change this outcome"

I believe that "small signal transistors" can have these parameters.  Has anyone tried any?

Tesla
   

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Yes, certain small signal transistors will operate
in inverse mode as a thyristor like device.

Here are some links for research:

Simplest LED Flasher

Negative Resistance Differential Oscillator

Alan's Lab

Deutschland

and some other possibilities

Home made Zinc Oxide device Dead Link Now removed

Iron Pyrites device Dead Link Now removed

It's nice to know about these kinds of devices.
With a little imagination and creativity some
very useful applications come to mind...
« Last Edit: 2017-06-20, 21:51:42 by Peterae »


---------------------------
"Truth: the most deadly weapon ever discovered by humanity. Capable of destroying entire perceptual sets, cultures, and realities. Outlawed by all governments everywhere. Possession is normally punishable by death." - John Gilmore (1935- ) Author
   
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I believe that "small signal transistors" can have these parameters.  Has anyone tried any?

Tesla

I did. The 2N2222 is well known and works well for this effect. I was able to let it oscillate by connecting only the collector and the emitter (as on Naudin's schematic given by Dumped).

Now, a negative resistance effect is just around a particular V/I point. Then when one increases V, I decreases. There is a dynamical gain, but at the expense of the static energy we need to polarize the component.

   
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Posts: 164
Here is a simple 9 MHz oscillator (10-30mA) based on Dr Stiffler's SEC circuits.  It will run 4-10 LEDs via an AV plug or up to 40-50 LEDs if you add Dr Stiffler's "L3" coil.

MPSA06 Transistor (ignore the PNP symbol.. it really is NPN):
http://www.mcmelectronics.com/product/MPSA06&CAWELAID=220730365

8.2uH Choke:
http://www.jameco.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/Product_10001_10001_372162_-1

9-50pF Trimmer:
http://www.jameco.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/Product_10001_10001_136979_-1

If you would like to replicate Dr Stiffler's "L3" coil:
1/2" PVC pipe
23 AWG magnet wire
70 turns
« Last Edit: 2011-04-26, 00:57:21 by 4Tesla »
   
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The 2N2222 is well known and works well for this effect. I was able to let it oscillate by connecting only the collector and the emitter (as on Naudin's schematic given by Dumped).
...

I played yesterday with negative resistance oscillators and found out a much better transistor for this purpose: 2N2369. It was used in the 70's in UHF TV tuners. All my 2N2369 work much better than the 2N2222: wider range of input voltages, much wider range of frequencies (up to 10 Mhz). Among them I have some with improved characteristics, able to oscillate up to 16 Mhz. I tried many other types of transistor but those working as negative resistance are rare.

You don't even need the L1C1 circuit (see http://jlnlabs.online.fr/cnr/images/negoscdg.gif). Only a capacitor in parallel with the resistance is needed. The L1C1 circuit adds a time constant different from R1C1. Both together don't work as one RLC circuit. They lead to bizarre signals in which periods of the highest frequency driven by LC spike during each half-period of the lowest frequency driven by RC. They synchronize but we see two effects as if RC and LC circuit act partly separately.

An adjustable power supply is very useful. The voltage has low and high thresholds for the oscillations to start, and the frequency is voltage dependant.
I have been impressed by the power of the oscillations. They are very strong, even when charged.

   
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You don't even need the L1C1 circuit (see http://jlnlabs.online.fr/cnr/images/negoscdg.gif). Only a capacitor in parallel with the resistance is needed. The L1C1 circuit adds a time constant different from R1C1. Both together don't work as one RLC circuit. They lead to bizarre signals in which periods of the highest frequency driven by LC spike during each half-period of the lowest frequency driven by RC. They synchronize but we see two effects as if RC and LC circuit act partly separately.

What is L1 in your circuit?  Do you use a 1k pot to adjust the frequency?  AV plug working?

Quote
Only a capacitor in parallel with the resistance is needed.
In series?

Thanks,
Tesla
   
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What is L1 in your circuit?  

Whatever inductance works. It is not at all critical.

Quote
Do you use a 1k pot to adjust the frequency?  AV plug working? In series?

I use a power supply adjustable from 0 to 32 v. I adjust the frequency by adjusting the voltage or by using a variable capacitor (around 20pF -> 1000pF) either in series with the inductance or in parallel with the resistance when the inductance is removed.
You can also replace R1 by a variable resistor from 0.1 to 4.7 Kohm and adjust the frequency with it (choose preferably a 10 turn pot).

Without inductance, oscillations are now obtained up to 23 Mhz. The system is strongly non linear, with rich harmonics. A quartz crystal in parallel with the resistance makes the system to oscillate on the crystal frequency, and the LC circuit can be tuned to any harmonic. I was also surprised to be able to tune the LC circuit to half the crystal frequency: the oscillations were at half the crystal frequency and locked at this frequency due to the crystal synchronized onto the first harmonic. It is the first time I succeeded in locking an oscillator onto a "sub-harmonic" of a crystal with such a simple circuit.

Note that all the stuff is conventional; funny but no OU can be expected.


   
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What amazes me is how efficient these oscillators are.  I'm interested in trying to make the most efficient LED driver possible for use in a LED lantern.
   
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What amazes me is how efficient these oscillators are.  I'm interested in trying to make the most efficient LED driver possible for use in a LED lantern.

Then you would not be interested in a Dr. Stiffler SEC oscillator.  The better path would be to experiment with three variables:  1)  How intensely you light the LED (how much voltage (or current) you light the LED with) without damaging it.  2) How long you keep the LED on.  3) How long you keep the LED off.

Note that 2) and 3) above define the LED energizing frequency and duty cycle.

Almost certainly your optimum LED flashing frequency will be somewhere between 60 and 70 Hz.  At least that's my preliminary guess.  How long it is on and how intensely it is lit when its on are the unknown variables that can be played with to find the most efficient LED driver solution.
   
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Hm... could the specific frequency referring to the  Larmor frequency.  It would varies based on the static field.  This is not an LC circuit frequency.  So I guess as C approaches zero, we would see this frequency after a pulse.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7aRKAXD4dAg
   
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