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Author Topic: Switched Reluctance Solid State Unit Patent  (Read 41120 times)
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WW,  so basically what you are saying is:    induction at right angles = no induction at all ... that's great!     :o


I'm looking at ION's drawing and I think it will oscillate for some time, because the spring and mass should have very low loss, mainly air friction, and hysteresis losses should be very small because we are avoiding flux reversal, and the screw contacts should not be dissipating much impact energy because of the slow velocity of impact.  

Nice design ION,  I like it.  You can start it by pulling back on the weight and letting go.  It will than go Tick tack tick tack ....  back and forth for many cycles until the energy imparted initially to the spring is dissipated.     O0

I also have hope for this design as a free energy device because at first glance it meets my FE criteria from Permanent magnets, which is: the magnet must be cycled along it's B-H curve, as a precondition.   It does because when the moving iron piece is perfectly horizontal, both the left and right sides have a low reluctance path for magnetic flux.  The magnet then operates at a particular point on it's B-H curve, call it U_high.   Than, when the gap is closed on one side,  the reluctance drops and flux increases and now the magnet is at a different B-H point on it's curve, call it U_low.    The only thing that I need to verify by calculation is how the flux gets divided between the two parallel flux paths, when one increases and the other decreases, does it decrease in the same proportion TO KEEP THE FLUX IN THE CENTER CONSTANT?   I hope not, than it wouldn't be cycling, but if it does, than the criteria is met and the energy levels are shifting inside the magnet, and in the whole circuit.


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So where is Mr. Lenz?

You killed him, shame on you!    LOL   ;D  :D

EM
   
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Here is a mechanical system that seems pretty analogous to the magnetic bistable latch presented by ION, as far as the force behavior is concerned. 

When rotated from the horizontal just slightly, the spring and roller will shift and begin to add torque about the lower pivot point further forcing the bar in the direction it started, until the bar hits the ground, or a stop.    It's also symmetrical so either side will behave the same.   To get it to switch states you have to put in the energy the spring delivered from the horizontal state.  This will get it back to horizontal and than it can snap the other way with the slightest offset.

Just something to think about.

EM
   
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WW,  so basically what you are saying is:    induction at right angles = no induction at all ... that's great!     :o

Not exactly. The result is much like an antenna performance change when one end is the opposite polarity...... ~30dB down. When the coils are close to each other you cannot totally block one inducing current into the other(without shielding, etc.).

The reason is the weakest form of induction only requires a changing flux density or changing coil area - even when the coils/loops are perpendicular to one another. When this is true the current induced is considerably smaller but the orientation of the coils prevents Lenz from producing that nasty opposing field.

So, I would say ' induction at right angles = no Lenz at all ... that's even better!'     :o

That would be my real #4 method. The funny thing is that most folks think this is the way induction always works.

#5 and #6 for another day. They don't apply here anyway.

So, no. There will be no effect on the action of the seesaw until your build it with coil windings  :)

Remember Peterae asking why the magnetic field strength didn't change when load was applied? The total magnetic force associated with a magnet doesn't change even when it is used in a generator or when the seesaw changes sides.

There is quite a bit not covered by the pioneers of this stuff.

More often... these details have been clarified or simplified from the original work and we just think it is new  >:(

« Last Edit: 2011-08-13, 12:58:38 by WaveWatcher »
   
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Here is a mechanical system that seems pretty analogous to the magnetic bistable latch presented by ION, as far as the force behavior is concerned.  

When rotated from the horizontal just slightly, the spring and roller will shift and begin to add torque about the lower pivot point further forcing the bar in the direction it started, until the bar hits the ground, or a stop.    It's also symmetrical so either side will behave the same.   To get it to switch states you have to put in the energy the spring delivered from the horizontal state.  This will get it back to horizontal and than it can snap the other way with the slightest offset.

Just something to think about.

EM


I was thinking more along the lines of the  steel spring blade in a microswitch, which assumes an "S" shape in the middle of it's cycle, but closes with considerable force when overcenter, assuming a "C" shape.

What you have shown is the classic toggle switch or old fashioned click=click wall switch design (before they went to silent type), spring and roller ball.

As I said, my aim is to harvest some of the output energy to aid kicking the oscillator to and fro. Since I cannot measure any change in velocity with coils loaded or unloaded, I will for now assume that harvesting a little energy will not stop the switch action.

It is really important to understand the spring blade and weight's function as an energy storage and phase shift device, totally different than what we are discussing here.

WW, EM thanks for your support.



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"Secrecy, secret societies and secret groups have always been repugnant to a free and open society"......John F Kennedy
   
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ION,

Do you plan on operating the bar and weight assembly at a specific frequency? If so, you should be able to calculate the weight and the length of the spring steel.
   
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ION,

Do you plan on operating the bar and weight assembly at a specific frequency? If so, you should be able to calculate the weight and the length of the spring steel.

Have no specific frequency in mind, will use trial and error. A length of hacksaw blade for the spring, a lead weight arranged to slide up or down and clamp to it in order to adjust frequency. If the blade is too stiff, I'll grind some away or use some clock spring material.

The real fun will be in trying to close the loop by adding a set of kick coils that will pull the spring blade at the appropriate time in the cycle. Then it's on to designing the pulse circuit for the kick coils.

Baby steps, one at a time.


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"Secrecy, secret societies and secret groups have always been repugnant to a free and open society"......John F Kennedy
   
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It's turtles all the way down
Here's a few more photo's with the spring and weights in place, enclosed in some scrap plexi.

Spring is a hacksaw blade, teeth ground of (so as not to harm myself), brazed to attachment screw.

By perturbing the spring to one side about 2 inches I get about ten transitions. Frequency changes very nicely by sliding the weights up or down the spring.

Next step is to measure the millijoules generated per transition by integrating the current pulse into a capacitor.

Further tests will be: the required force to create a transition, ft/lbs or metric units.

Failure will be one or more of the following:

a) a poorly thought out idea

b) poor clockmaker and machining skills

c) Mr. Lenz is lurking somewhere.


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"Secrecy, secret societies and secret groups have always been repugnant to a free and open society"......John F Kennedy
   

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tExB=qr
Wesley Gary would be proud!
   
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It's turtles all the way down
Wesley Gary would be proud!

I built the Wesley Gary unit about 15 years ago.......no luck. slightly different operating principle there.

Wish I had a better shop and better eyes or an apprentice with good eyes. The accuracy level to which I can work is not very high at this point.

Output of my device is disappointingly low.  Little over one volt per complete cycle into a 1488 uF capacitor (measured value) using Schottky rectifiers in a bridge configuration on each side. Not much energy there.

Edit: Coil resistance of 470 Ohms is soaking up what is generated. With 1uF cap 50 volts is obtained per cycle.
I'll stack some low resistance coils and see what happens.

Back to the drawing board.
« Last Edit: 2011-08-14, 20:36:29 by ION »


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"Secrecy, secret societies and secret groups have always been repugnant to a free and open society"......John F Kennedy
   

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Connect one leg of a HV DC power supply to the core.  You just need potential and negligible current.

Francis Nipher found that connecting HV DC potential (either leg) increased the strength of magnets, and concluded that the permeability of air was increased around the magnet.

If the permeability is changed by the addition of the potential, you can change the permeability with very little energy by applying and removing the HV potential.  It might also work by changing current in a coil with a core, but this requires more energy.
   
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