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Author Topic: TPU and Iron wire Theories  (Read 59301 times)
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I thought these video links (posted by verpies in another thread) should also be posted here, since I believe they are related to the operation of the TPU


Quote
Take a look at these videos for an example of unusual resonance in a ferrite.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Uar62T9GLXI
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CkLyeiDJeF8
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qR0aYaHZyMc

Is this effect Magnetoacoustic or NMR in nature (or both) ?


in addition, here's the image grab of the phenomena when harmonic distortion sets in.  (x-y mode of the oscilloscope)  

It is apparent that the waveform is distorted on the left side (in addition to the obvious filling in of the circle by harmonic distortions and intermodulation products)    If we assume the voltage is along the y-axis, and the current along the x-axis,  the current has a DC level to it, and its due to the fact that the ferite is biased magnetically.   I observed similar phenomena on one of my oscillators a while back.    

I wish I had a decent oscilloscope to experiment!   >:(

EM

PS.  I added other video image grabs for reference.
« Last Edit: 2013-05-13, 05:32:38 by EMdevices »
   
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thinking about this some more, I notice that a beat frequency seems to get set up, about 920 hz.  There is a ferite resonance mode that splits in two, off in frequency by 920 Hz.  Of course we can't see all the details, but those ring patterns are sure interesting.

the guy certainly does good work.

EM

PS.  Here's how the ring should look, without the magnetic bias.  (red waveform, i.e.  perfect circle.)  The reason it is a circle is because the voltage  and current (channel 1 and 2, that form the x-y axis,) are 90 deg out of phase, and that produces a perfect circle.  But if there is an imbalance, it will be lopsided as we can see.

another thing to note from his videos, he explains that he uses and H bridge to drive the ferite.  The H bridge is driven by the rectangular waveform with controllable duty cycle, which he shows on the scope on some of the videos  (there's a few more videos besides the ones posted above)  So that's why he says the resonances he observes are "self triggering" I believe.

I added the second image, look at all those harmonics adding up to produce that interesting beat pattern.  I can spot at least two other frequencies besides the main high frequency drive signal. The magnet is oriented differently for this setup then the other setups.
« Last Edit: 2013-05-13, 05:46:25 by EMdevices »
   
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This is quite exciting guys, it appears I may be on the verge of a breakthrough in how the iron wire is used in the TPU.


I have a large coil of what appears to be a copper clad ferromagnetic core wire, and I say that because it looks like copper on the outside, but it attracts strongly to a regular ceramic magnet, and I can almost see a different color in the core.

well, I've studied the resistance change of a ferromagnetic wire under magnetisation before, but today I revisited these experiments with a larger coil of this material.  I have probably 50 or so turns, just an aircore coil of about 10 cm diameter.  

I hooked up an ohmeter to the ends and it has about 2 ohms, and when I bring a magnet close to it changes slightly, maybe by 0.1 ohms,  however,  I decided to implement a rotational magnetic field, and bingo, the meter goes crazy!   Resistance goes high to k ohms, then down, sometimes it goes NEGATIVE, and the strangest thing is that the magnet is not even close to the coil, maybe one radius distance away (small ceramic bar magnet, about  4 cm long and 0.5 cm wide)  

The key seems to be a constant rotational motion!   not even fast, I was moving the magnet by hand at about 2 Hz rate.    O0

Maybe this triggers a constant Barkhousen noise, but I hooked it up to the oscilloscope and I don't see much (maybe I need amplification), but my ohmeter sure goes crazy, and this is odd, because the ohmeter of all things should have low pass filtering, so I think the iron wire is indeed generating a DC voltage that messes with the ohmeter reading.

EM
   
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This phenomena seems to match the description of operation that Steven gave, i.e., his analogy of squeezing the hose. 

So imagine that now I can rotate the field much faster, the tiny little current I'm generating should increase tremendously.  So I need to build a Tesla AC stator coil to generate the rotating magnetic field.

I think I'm going to try and build a negative resistance oscillator as well, based on this resistance changes with magnetization phenomena.

EM
« Last Edit: 2013-05-31, 07:03:53 by EMdevices »
   
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...
I hooked up an ohmeter to the ends and it has about 2 ohms, and when I bring a magnet close to it changes slightly, maybe by 0.1 ohms,  however,  I decided to implement a rotational magnetic field, and bingo, the meter goes crazy!   Resistance goes high to k ohms, then down, sometimes it goes NEGATIVE, and the strangest thing is that the magnet is not even close to the coil, maybe one radius distance away (small ceramic bar magnet, about  4 cm long and 0.5 cm wide)  
...
 so I think the iron wire is indeed generating a DC voltage that messes with the ohmeter reading.
...

Hi EM,

I apologize for telling this but I found a similar behaviour with a digital L meter. When I measured an air core coil (from copper wire) and inserted certain types of permanent magnets into it to see any change in coil inductance, I noticed that the change was casued by simply Faraday induction.  When the magnet was stationary inside the coil the L meter showed a very very little difference in inductance value vs the no magnet case.
Perhaps you may wish to repeat your test with a copper wire coil, moving your magnet with the same speed than in the iron wire coil case.

Gyula
   
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Hi gyula, I tried a copper coil before and again today and you are correct, the induced emf does affect the digital ohms meter.  The neat thing about the iron wire is that the magnet can move along circumference, (not in and out) so not inducing an emf through induction, but rather triggering the Barhousen noise from magnetic domain flipping which does induce an emf that disturbs the meter.
   
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Hi EM,

Thanks and here are two old papers you may find interesting reading:

http://archive.org/details/philtrans01999829

http://archive.org/details/philtrans01387885

Gyula
   
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Hi EM,

Thanks and here are two old papers you may find interesting reading:

http://archive.org/details/philtrans01999829

http://archive.org/details/philtrans01387885

Gyula
Interesting papers. It triggered a thought about the "iron wire" in the TPU. Somewhere it was stated as "soft iron". I ran into this also in the Hendershot Magnatronic Generator and was thinking of physically soft, i.e. less carbon than steel. But what is actually meant is magnetically soft - very high magnetic relative permeability and low coercivity. 

The reason the papers triggered the remembrance is that it was discovered only shortly later - 1914, developed over next decade, and found that annealing the material would higher enhance its magnetic properties. It was initially used to shield transatlantic telephone transmission cables to improve transmission of signals in cables by reducing distortion.

The relative permeability or Permalloy at around 100,000 contrasts sharply with the several thousand of ordinary steel.

Permalloy is roughly 80% nickel and 20% iron. There are different formulations which have different properties and annealing requirements but, generally speaking, it is the same as mu metal.

It retains no magnetic field when the source of magnetism is removed and has a narrow hysteresis curve. It can therefore be used in transformers at higher frequencies than silicone steel.

"Permalloy's electrical resistivity can vary as much as 5% depending on the strength and the direction of an applied magnetic field."
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Permalloy
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mu-metal
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Magnetoresistance

It might be helpful to experiment with Permalloy or mu metal wire in the TPU. I see people are still working on the TPU so thought I would mention it.
   
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Use fine magnetically soft wire as the core of a toroid.  Have that wire suspended in some manner so that it can vibrate (didn't SM have his wire on thin cork?).  Wind four drive coils of sufficient diameter that the magnetic wire core can vibrate within them.  Now supply HF drive to the four coils with a 90 degree phase shift as you advance round the hoop.  You get a rotating magnetic field as Tesla predicted over 100 years ago.  You get magnetic poles whizzing around that magnetic wire at tremendous speed.  And according to my theory published elsewhere on OUR that pole movement conjures up inertial forces from the Earth's huge scalar magnetic potential.  That excites the hoop into mechanical resonance if you get the right drive frequency.  Now you can have other coils taking off energy from that vibrating wire.  As the TV advert says, "Simple".

Smudge
   

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Hi Smudge

Here is my idea of an iron toroid and the drive circuit, all passive. That circuit does work but never used on the iron toroid I have drawn.

It is cut into 4 segments with a small spacer between each.

The drive circuit combines two frequencies and the coils are in a bucking mode which form the delayed bucking movement.

I have not time to try this with all my other work, it is part of STEAP which goes back some years, on ferrite I could get it running for a long time untill the battery blew from high voltage spikes, Luc of gotoluc has seen this on a live stream I did.

Regards

Mike 8)


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"All truth passes through three stages. First, it is ridiculed, second it is violently opposed, and third, it is accepted as self-evident."
Arthur Schopenhauer, Philosopher, 1788-1860

As a general rule, the most successful person in life is the person that has the best information.
   
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