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Author Topic: Russians replicate TPU  (Read 11071 times)
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The Russians Croatians are making some serious progress in rediscovering the TPU.  

I just found this video online (first one on the webpage, but there's few more) and it appears the device is running in over unity mode.

(input  0.17 Amps, 12 Volts,  so about 2 watts,  yet he lights up an incandescent light bulb, which must be consuming at least 20 to 40 watts)

The video zooms in on a few components, and you can pretty much see everything.  Now it would be nice to understand what they say.  Can anybody translate?  


Here's the webpage link:  

http://freeenergylt.narod.ru/index/0-16


EM


PS,  Wow, the second video is very interesting.  He tunes the device and the input current goes bellow 0.05, so the screen shows 00.0, as you can see in the second picture.  He runs it from a 12 or 6 volt battery.   You can hear him tune the device and hear the high pitch squeal from a ferite core.  He shows few waveforms on the scope, and zooms in on the "kick" or impulse.
« Last Edit: 2013-06-15, 05:54:42 by EMdevices »
   

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It's not as complicated as it may seem...
Where's the video link EM?


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Where's the video link EM?
Hi Poynt
The video's are in the link provided.-
http://freeenergylt.narod.ru/index/0-16      I think we can get this effect,and show how it may be done.
   

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It's not as complicated as it may seem...
Hmm,

For me, no video links are there when the page loads.

ETA: OK, Firefox was messed up somehow, and the embedded Youtube links weren't visible.
« Last Edit: 2013-06-15, 03:33:15 by poynt99 »


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Here's the direct link to the youtube video:   (part 3/4, and 4/4, the other parts seem to be a different device)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XRB-NSczJak

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AXbNVCLF2u0&feature=endscreen&NR=1
« Last Edit: 2013-06-15, 06:41:15 by EMdevices »
   
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I heard one of the guys in the video say:   "tristo vat"  and I typed it into google translate, and what do you know,  the detected language is CROATIAN!   (it means:  "300 watts"  referring to the light bulb)


So I screwed up the title:   It's not Russians its Croatians!  

BTW, Nikola Tesla was born in Croatia as well, and so was our late friend Otto, that passed away not to long ago from a heart attack.   The design these guys are using seems to be Otto's,  very typical with that larger and smaller concentric rings.  This is quite interesting!

EM

PS,  Here's some more frame grabs from the video.  I can see the power wires coming in from the digital power source  (the one that displays 0.17 Amps, 12 Volts)  but in addition he is dicking around with the battery and clamp on ampmeter in front of the unit, so maybe this is power just for the electronics oscillator.
« Last Edit: 2013-06-15, 17:57:44 by EMdevices »
   
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It's turtles all the way down
Not sure if I get the point of using an inexpensive Centech type meter (AC amps only using the clamp) to measure DC current from (or is it into?) the battery.

They seem to be elated when the AC reading goes to zero??

Since a power supply is already hooked to the unit what is the point of the battery?

Without a good translation, it is hard to figure what these guys are doing.

Also the bulb does not look like it is burning  at 300 Watt capacity, although it mayindeed be rated for 300 Watts.

Looks more like around 50 to 100 Watts burn rate.


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right,  that amp meter on the battery circuit is suspicious, but than again it changes when they tune it, and I don't think the current is 50 or 60 Hz, but higher frequency, which makes me think that maybe it does work with DC current.   (I never owned a clamp-on ammeter, and always assumed they record AC currents at low frequency, until somebody set me straight)

I would say that since the room is darkened, the burn rate of the light bulb is probably even less than 50 to 100 watts,  I would put it at no more than 20 watts.   I lit a bulb once, with a spiky waveform like he is demonstrating, and it took only 4 watts,  but it was a 60 watt bulb, so if we scale this up by a factor of 5,  we arrive at about 20 watts.

 
   

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Frequency equals matter...


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Yes, the device looks like an ECD.


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I've completed a detail analysis of the video and this is my conclusion:

The digital power supply is used to feed the oscillator and circuitry, because its regulated and does not draw that much power and it's fixed.

The power for the light bulb comes from the battery, when its connected the bulb lights up.

The clamp on meter, IS NOT DESIGNED TO MEASURE DC CURRENT  (not this model, others that use Hall sensors can)

Here's a picture of the meter from the video, and one from the internet that I tracked down after a long search.  The model is DT 266 clamp meter   (CE certified) and if you read what it can measure, its only AC current with the clamp.

EM
   
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It's turtles all the way down
I'm in complete agreement with your iidentification of the clamp meter. I have two of those, they are very inexpensive, sold by Harbor Freight on sale for around $10 to $15 US. They do not measure DC with the clamp.

I am puzzled by their use of the clamp meter on a DC circuit. Can they possibly  be that stupid about the use of such a meter on a DC circuit?

Quote
The power for the light bulb comes from the battery, when its connected the bulb lights up.

I did not see a correlation between the battery  wire on / off vs. light as the camera did not show the two at once. How did you arrive at this conclusion? Can you point to the video and time mark where both are see?


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"Secrecy, secret societies and secret groups have always been repugnant to a free and open society"......John F Kennedy
   
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In the part 3/4 video,  they start off with the lamp off, and the digital power supply on, they film it.  I also traced the wires from this power supply and they go to the board.  

On the other hand,  the battery has thicker wires, and when he connects the battery (time 1:20) the bulb lights up.  (you hear guys say "hopa" when the lamp comes on)  

The fact that the digital supply does not change indicates it's powering the oscillating circuitry, and the battery powers the lamp (probably goes to a MOSFET drain and with the ECD coils in series, as Otto showed in his schematics)


Sorry to get everyone excited for nothing, I gave these guys the benefit of doubt.  I figured there were a few of them filming and checking up on the details, but apparently all of them are ignorant, and the inventor could be fraudulent.  He has to know the clamp meter does not measure DC current.  Maybe he did not read the owners manual because it's in English, or maybe he was deceived by the fact that he did measure some current when he adjusted the oscillator, which is puzzling but can be explained by some AC coupling to the DC supply line.

EM
   
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It's turtles all the way down
You don't need a manual to see that the amps setting "A" has a sine wave next to it.

Why don't they hook the whole deal to the power supply to get an accurate P in?

There is no proof of concept, nor data to show so in the ECD document.

Do they have an operational theory that makes sense?


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"Secrecy, secret societies and secret groups have always been repugnant to a free and open society"......John F Kennedy
   
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My opinion is that this device is nothing more than a boost converter, albeit a very fancy looking one. 
   
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I've got one of these clamp meters, and it works quite well for RMS voltages and currents, it measures DC current fairly accurately but it is finicky, it only measures down to 0.1 A resolution and the relative button must be pressed to zero it before use, it also won't measure amps accurately unless the battery is well charged. It can measure DC with HF ripple ok in lower frequency situations like a few Khz. But if it is put anywhere near an oscillating field like even a very low powered Tesla coil, the Ammeter goes nuts. I don't trust it for measuring low current, HF AC or DC currents. But for a clamp meter it's a good one.

THis is an example of how unreliable clamp meters are with HF fields present.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=44M8s3UFuro

..
   
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It's turtles all the way down
The one on the left in this picture:

http://www.harborfreight.com/catalogsearch/result?q=clamp+meter

Is the one used in the Russian video. Made by Centech around $10 US. No Hall effect sensing for DC Amps

Your clamp meter is a totally different animal, a Digitech QM series around $80 US and does read DC amps with the clamp.


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"Secrecy, secret societies and secret groups have always been repugnant to a free and open society"......John F Kennedy
   
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