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Author Topic: TK Replicates  (Read 128881 times)

Group: Tinkerer
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tExB=qr
The effective shorted L3 soaks all the power from the primary coil and dissipates it as heat.

what do you mean by "soaks all the power" ?
   
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It's turtles all the way down
what do you mean by "soaks all the power" ?

Lets say you have a transformer operated off the mains. It has two 12 volt secondaries to which two 12 volt bulbs are attached.

If you short circuit one of the secondaries, all of the magnetic energy will go to that winding overheating it and of course it's lamp will go completely out. Meanwhile, the other lamp on the unshorted secondary will extinguish or be very dim, as the shorted winding has "soaked up" or usurped all the available magnetic energy.

There will also be excess current drawn on the primary and may blow a fuse depending on the winding resistance or alternately the transformer will cook.


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"Secrecy, secret societies and secret groups have always been repugnant to a free and open society"......John F Kennedy
   

Group: Tinkerer
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Posts: 3208
tExB=qr
Why does that effectively turn off the output of the two open windings? 

Are you saying that the shorted coil absorbs all of the current supplied by the input coil?
   

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If primary and any secondary are tightly coupled to the core shorting a secondary lowers the impedance and inductive value in the primary.

That makes primary wire resistance a larger influence in the primary's impedance value, lowers inductive coupling to the rest of the transformer and reduces induction to all secondaries.

At the same time, since wire resistance becomes a larger factor than inductance, the primary radiates the energy as heat rather than storing it in the core for use by the secondaries.

Applying DC to any winding does almost exactly the same thing. The DC current locks the core's magnetic domains so they aren't storing energy from the primary (core saturation).

This concept is used in self-calibrating current transformer sensing circuits. A second winding in the CT has DC applied to control how sensitive the CT is to the measured AC current.

It doesn't turn-off the output of the secondaries as much as it makes the energy loss move to the primary.
 


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"As far as the laws of mathematics refer to reality, they are not certain; as far as they are certain, they do not refer to reality." - Einstein

"What we observe is not nature itself, but nature exposed to our method of questioning." - Werner Heisenberg
   

Group: Tinkerer
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Posts: 3208
tExB=qr
Thanks WW.  That is a great explanation.
   

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You are welcome.

With that explanation.... doesn't it make you wonder about all those OU buffs touting shorted windings as a means to OU?

Sometimes, things go a bit crazy....


---------------------------
"As far as the laws of mathematics refer to reality, they are not certain; as far as they are certain, they do not refer to reality." - Einstein

"What we observe is not nature itself, but nature exposed to our method of questioning." - Werner Heisenberg
   
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