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2024-06-20, 01:35:59
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Author Topic: DCRS - Korean wireless energy, my mini replication  (Read 4392 times)
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This stuff is fascinating.
I'd not heard of DCRS until a good friend pointed me at a YouTube video, this one:

[youtube]R6UCwqjdpo0[/youtube]

So, Dipole Coil Resonant System eh, lovely jubbly.
I decided to partially replicate it, as a home made simple version and run it on 1.5V

Here's my vid:

[youtube]veYKg25X5Uw[/youtube]

1.5V and using 20mA.
A tiny system, but allowing a lot of room for tunings and to move to higher voltages if wished further on.

Specs of the transmitter side:
Transistor - MPSA18
Cap - '101' ceramic
Resistor - 7.1K (1x5K, 1x2.2K whose tolerances gave 7.1K total)
Ferrite rod with 17 turns one side, center tap, 18 turns on the other of approx 32AWG.

Receive side:
0-512pF variable capacitor
4x 1N4148 diodes
10uF electrolytic capacitor
Ferrite rod with original factory radio windings in place.
 

A summary would be that it works well and is very simple to build.
A test LED on a round ferrite choke showed that the best outputs come, marginally, from 1 side of the ferrite.
Different coils have been tried and i'll include pics of those at some point in the near future.
Best performing so far, has been a comparitively large half semi circle of ferrite from the tube of a CRT monitor, with approx 20AWG wire in the now familiar 17+18 turns arrangement.
Inductive range of that coil has been a measured 3.5" with a red LED on the receiving section. That comapres with an average 2" until a marked fade off of LED glow.
A stock standard radio ferrite with its original windings has been tried and does work, though with a much reduced output.  
All very rudimentary so far.

Whether the Korean guys intended for the turns to be asymmetrical isn't known. On my own variant, the slight spacing of their turns has less output than a closer coupling of all turns being tight side by side.


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ʎɐqǝ from pɹɐoqʎǝʞ a ʎnq ɹǝʌǝu
   
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Some changes to the circuit, mainly in an effort to use standard components.

4.7K resistor now replaces the 7.1K duo on the transmitter.
'471' ceramic cap replaces the original '101'.
Indicated amperage draw has gone up from approx 20mA to 23mA, but the results form a better match when combined with a readily found capacitor on the receiver circuit.
That capacitor on the receiver circuit is a '331' and it sits across the input rails from the receiver coil...removing the need for the variable capacitor and which has now been removed.

Shown in the pic is a half circle ferrite piece, wound 17 turns, center tap, 18 turns.
On the receiver side is a batteryless digital watch circuit, the same one as demonstrated in the vid above.



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Anyone who has used a grid dip oscillator will know that a resonant circuit has the remarkable ability to suck in power from the near-field.  It is something that is not taught in physics or electromagnetics, but the near field (that is closer than say one tenth of a wavelength) stores energy that can be clawed back.  When you electrically charge a sphere the energy stored in the electric field can (almost) all be got back when you discharge it.  The same thing goes for an inductor charged with current, the energy stored in the field around it is recouped when you discharge it.  That is energy running backwards, and our EM theories don't explain how that happens, how that energy is actually stored in space.  Having a resonant circuit in that near-field somehow improves the coupling to that space store of energy, and that should tell us something about how it is stored there.

Smudge
   
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Thanks Smudge :)

An extension of the so called Back EMF ?
That seems quite fascinating, to couple to it and fully draw upon it, perhaps boosting a resonant condition.
There's always a waste into the 'air'. No matter how efficient the coupling of a receiver, something else can always be powered on the 180 degree other side. Spheres and other geometries always seem to be ignored with such things.
 
In my experience, when saturation is reached there is a pull down of all devices on introducing even a little extra, such as 1 LED. Nothing is directed or focused though and that's a big area to work on. Indeed, can wireless energies be beam guided ? such as using a geometry based on (crushed to form) ferrite ?


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ʎɐqǝ from pɹɐoqʎǝʞ a ʎnq ɹǝʌǝu
   
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We may find out, if these Russian guys are successful:
http://rt.com/news/170468-tesla-tower-rebuild-project/
In fact, if they publish the time and date of the great switch on test, wouldn't it be cool to intercept a bit of that energy ?!

I dunno with the health effects. A hammer approach like microwave ovens and cellphones are one thing, but Tesla did live to be 86 years old and I kinda think he would have been a good guinea pig.
Good point though, it would be a bit late for health concerns when everyone is dropping like flies.
I'm quite sure that Oppenheimer was of similar thinking, when they first tested their little wartime idea.

Those coils are indeed too big. If someone built a mile long system and got 5m out of it it would be deemed a failure.


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ʎɐqǝ from pɹɐoqʎǝʞ a ʎnq ɹǝʌǝu
   
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