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Author Topic: HELP PLEASE! 40hz light to restore gamma waves to the brain to fight Alzheimers  (Read 35149 times)

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Thanks Jim,

a kind of chaotic podcast, but indeed she was talking in the end about "OED lights", so pointing to these new Oled lights.

http://www.photonics.com/Article.aspx?AID=35845

http://www.oled-lights.org/category/oled-lights/

Itsu
Ahaaa I missed that. I don't think we are the target demographic for that podcast  ;D

Just had a look at some oled panels on alibaba https://www.alibaba.com/showroom/oled-light-panel.html

ok using a pn1000 driving 24 leds. thanks
« Last Edit: 2016-12-14, 03:56:57 by JimBoot »
   
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Jim
as mentioned,  It will be necessary to see if the required repair sequence is stimulated by this light pulse therapy.

here is an example just to show how simple this home brew EEG [Electroencephalogram]  could be [seeing brain activity]

http://www.instructables.com/id/DIY-EEG-and-ECG-Circuit/

very exciting possibilities here   O0
   
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I did some tests with LEDs at 40 Hz and discovered that even with a duty cycle of 50% the LEDs do not deliver peak brightness.

It takes longer than 12.5 ms to light up the LEDs on my PIC development board to their full brightness. They are even less bright at a duty cycle of 20% or 10%.

So, it takes "fast" LEDs to do a good flickering at 40 Hz. The ones on my development board are not "fast" enough.

By "fast" I mean that a LED reaches peak brightness in a short time (shorter than 12.5 ms).

Greetings, Conrad

P.S.: Peak brightness is of course influenced by the series resistor in front of the LED. On my PIC development board there are 470 Ohm series resistors (at 5 V). With 20 Hz and a duty cycle of 50% (25 ms) the LEDs seem to reach the peak brightness. 12.5 ms is too short and 25 ms is already long enough.
   

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Jim
as mentioned,  It will be necessary to see if the required repair sequence is stimulated by this light pulse therapy.

here is an example just to show how simple this home brew EEG [Electroencephalogram]  could be [seeing brain activity]

http://www.instructables.com/id/DIY-EEG-and-ECG-Circuit/

very exciting possibilities here   O0


Nice info Chet,

but this seems to me an advanced project i think as it involves lots of (notch) filtering to get the 50 /60 Hz from the environment out of the way, but doable.

There are some apps available for monitoring your brain waves, see this link which mentiones a few:

https://www.diygenius.com/hacking-your-brain-waves/

Itsu
   
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... .-.. .. -.. . .-.
That plastic headband thing looks right for the job...neat, simple, nothing like a Frankenstein contraption. Will read more about those methods Itsu !

Seems to me, that what we are seeing is the combination of several previously 'fringe' technologies, now shaping up to be a real medical breakthrough because MIT have allowed their name to be associated.
Calls of scam and snake oil don't apply to that Uni !
Am also quite sure that what we could end up with, is a wearable device that features neural feedback. Wrist worn, like a watch, it would prevent losing the thing around the house. Probes could plug in via a 4 pole 3.5mm jack socket, same as seen on Raspberry Pi's.
It could log data with real-time uploads to a cloud service such as Thingspeak. Trained medical personnel could then monitor the brainwaves, as part of the human trials effectiveness.
An ESP8266 or ESP32 could take the readings and upload (ESP8266 are around $3 and offer WiFi, an 80MHz CPU and similar connectivity to Arduino's).
In fact....am working on a wearable that could be converted for this use at the moment.
I won't clog this thread up with such an aside, but will make a Bench post and shoot a demo vid. See what you guys think, if it could be a route. A future possible solution for home trials.
It was going to be an Indiegogo campaign idea, but could suit this purpose.



A repeat of my YouTube comment re: Jim's video...just in case it's better here than there:
That's a very cool build Jim ! For a timer, one way is to buy a DS1307 or similar battery backed clock module. They are only around $1 and give time functionality to the Arduino. You'd then set the time in software once, then leave it to run for however long the onboard CR2032 coin battery lasted...years perhaps. In such a way, you could set the times to start flashing and times to go off, but could turn the actual device on and off the same as you did here and not lose the time info.


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I haven't read in detail through all the posts here but it seems you may be trying to re-invent the wheel so to speak as there are already a couple things that may do this better and more easily.   There are many Mind machines or brain tuners out there like the Theta Technologies Voyager XL (I've had one of these for over 20 years).   The Voyager has glasses with LED's built in and has preset programs that can achieve up to around 108 Hz but also can be custom programmed.  It also uses binaural flickering of the LED's and sound output to earphones that will help synchronize the left and right brain hemispheres.   
     But possibly even better and cheaper is that people have made apps now for Android phones that will do essentially the same thing.  Those apps are also fairly easy to modify.   You can use them by placing the phone across your eyes or just get a cheap Google goggle type setup (I see Walmart has a nicer plastic model with foam to hold Android phones now for only $15)  It produces the same effects as a Voyager and similar brain tuners.   When using my Voyager XL which has red LED's I see all sorts of different colors (you keep your eyes closed when using it but the LED's show through your eyelids) depending on the program and frequencies used.   Other people I've shown it to get a real 'Wow' out of it on the higher energy programs.   Some of the programs are specifically made to stimulate the brain. 
    For a while the Theta tech Voyager XL was not available due to harassment from the mainstream medical - they don't like competition for their drugs from electronic devices but I see now they are available again and I think they are one of the best :  http://www.thetavoyager.com/     but as I said you can do similar things if you have an Android phone and are able to modify the binaural brain apps that are readily available on Google play.   I've got some of them and the pro versions.   Let me know if you'd like them.
   
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Just Google "Mind machines" to see many of these types of devices.   One warning on using these - if a person has or is prone to epilepsy you should not use these as it can in some cases trigger the epilepsy.   
   

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Ok Mark has explained how I can add a timer to this as well. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=96p5EQmsQUU
   

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I did some tests with LEDs at 40 Hz and discovered that even with a duty cycle of 50% the LEDs do not deliver peak brightness.

It takes longer than 12.5 ms to light up the LEDs on my PIC development board to their full brightness. They are even less bright at a duty cycle of 20% or 10%.

So, it takes "fast" LEDs to do a good flickering at 40 Hz. The ones on my development board are not "fast" enough.

By "fast" I mean that a LED reaches peak brightness in a short time (shorter than 12.5 ms).

Greetings, Conrad

P.S.: Peak brightness is of course influenced by the series resistor in front of the LED. On my PIC development board there are 470 Ohm series resistors (at 5 V). With 20 Hz and a duty cycle of 50% (25 ms) the LEDs seem to reach the peak brightness. 12.5 ms is too short and 25 ms is already long enough.

Conrad,

thanks for looking into this, so we might need fast leds, but on the other hand, do we really need peak brightness as we only want the correct (40Hz) flickering.


Itsu

   

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I haven't read in detail through all the posts here but it seems you may be trying to re-invent the wheel so to speak as there are already a couple things that may do this better and more easily.   There are many Mind machines or brain tuners out there like the Theta Technologies Voyager XL (I've had one of these for over 20 years).   The Voyager has glasses with LED's built in and has preset programs that can achieve up to around 108 Hz but also can be custom programmed.  It also uses binaural flickering of the LED's and sound output to earphones that will help synchronize the left and right brain hemispheres.   
     But possibly even better and cheaper is that people have made apps now for Android phones that will do essentially the same thing.  Those apps are also fairly easy to modify.   You can use them by placing the phone across your eyes or just get a cheap Google goggle type setup (I see Walmart has a nicer plastic model with foam to hold Android phones now for only $15)  It produces the same effects as a Voyager and similar brain tuners.   When using my Voyager XL which has red LED's I see all sorts of different colors (you keep your eyes closed when using it but the LED's show through your eyelids) depending on the program and frequencies used.   Other people I've shown it to get a real 'Wow' out of it on the higher energy programs.   Some of the programs are specifically made to stimulate the brain. 
    For a while the Theta tech Voyager XL was not available due to harassment from the mainstream medical - they don't like competition for their drugs from electronic devices but I see now they are available again and I think they are one of the best :  http://www.thetavoyager.com/     but as I said you can do similar things if you have an Android phone and are able to modify the binaural brain apps that are readily available on Google play.   I've got some of them and the pro versions.   Let me know if you'd like them.

E2matrix,

thanks for the info, any "mind machine" that can flicker its leds at 40Hz would be useable, as that is all we apparently need.
Not sure where these binaural brain apps fit in here as we do not need sound.


Itsu
   
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Conrad,

thanks for looking into this, so we might need fast leds, but on the other hand, do we really need peak brightness as we only want the correct (40Hz) flickering.

Itsu

If you look at Jimboot's latest video https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=96p5EQmsQUU you see the problem. We do not need peak brightness, but we would need a LED that really goes OFF (no light emitted) 40 times per second. In Jimboot's video one sees that the LEDs are never OFF, the brightness only varies. And I have observed the same with the LEDs on my PIC bread bord at 40 Hz (even with a duty cycle of only 10% and very clearly with duty cycle of 50%).

In order to call it "true flickering" the LED should come ON (emitting light) and go OFF (no light is emitted) 40 times per second. The available LEDs take longer than 12.5 ms to reach full brightness (which would not be a problem) but also take longer than 12.5 ms till they go completely OFF.

So, at 40 Hz the LEDs always emit light, just get brighter when they are ON and diminish a bit when they are OFF. Is this "true flickering"?

May be that does not matter and the alleged "Anti-Alzheimer-Effect" is still there? It might be academic to demand that the LED goes completely OFF?

In all types of lamps there is always this afterglow effect. May be gas discharge lamps (FLs, CFLs) are faster than 12.5 ms? But I doubt that.

May be switching on a LED very shortly (e.g. 3 ms) and only reaching minimal brightness would help. I will try that on Friday with a function generator and various series resistors in front of the LED. May be the light output of the LED has to be measured with a photo diode or photo transistor to see whether it goes really OFF.

If the LED is only allowed to emit very little light it has to be placed close to the eye or one uses the set up in darkness.

Greetings, Conrad
   
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Sorry, accidental post.
   
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... .-.. .. -.. . .-.
I find that to be quite fascinating Conrad !
Here was me thinking that LED's were so fast to react that there would only be issues in the KHz range.
Do you know which brands are fast and whether they carry a cost premium ?
It would do the research a lot of good to find the fastest and slowest LED's, for comparison studies...at least to know if there is a good strong difference in effectiveness.


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E2matrix,

thanks for the info, any "mind machine" that can flicker its leds at 40Hz would be useable, as that is all we apparently need.
Not sure where these binaural brain apps fit in here as we do not need sound.


Itsu

Sound just enhances the effects of the brain entrainment to the frequency the eyes see.   But it's not needed on these mind machines if you don't want to use earphones it will still work.  The binaural greatly helps in getting the brain to entrain to a particular frequency.  The LED's flickering in one eye are a slightly different frequency than for the other eye.  The brain automatically wants to synchronize the two so it brings the right and left hemispheres of the brain together in a way that can have profound effects.   I had not looked for the Voyager online for some years and see now that in my previous post the web site I gave was not actually for the original Theta technologies web site but just a site that sells them and also noted they now call them the "Mind's Eye" rather than the Voyager XL - perhaps because there is an electronic music keyboard called a Voyager XL.   
     
    Beside that I think Jimboot should seriously look at the Google play store - search "binaural beats" and you'll find a bunch of free apps and I already see one that can do Gamma and I think it's 40 Hz.   I'm downloading it myself right now to check it out.   I think about everyone has a smartphone nowadays don't they.   I just picked up a nice Quad core processor 5.1" screeen Android smartphone (ZTE brand)  new for $10 at a local grocery store.   They are certainly more affordable than ever.   I do think it would be an easy way to get started quickly.  Those goggles I saw at Walmart can be had for about $4 online out of China and maybe eBay too.   
   
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Mindroid is the app you want for an Android phone.   It's programmable to exactly 40 Hz and has lots of options.  It divides the screen in half so when you lay the phone horizontally over your face you have two large round circles that flash over your eyes.  You can pinch them to move them closer together or further apart to align to your eyes.   I believe this will do everything you want without having to build anything.   I'm attaching the latest version - it's newer than the one I have on my phone so I'll check it out too but it's an awesome program.   Please delete this after downloading it as I think it's the pro version.

Ok, it's been  awhile since I used this app - I just confirmed that in order to edit the frequency of a session you need to either create a 'New' session or you can download a session off their web site from within the app.   The built in sessions can't be edited so just download an session like "Magic 11" and once it's downloaded (free and it's very fast to download) then you can edit that session to be straight 40 Hz if you want.   Or touch 'Program' and then choose '+New' on the bottom left.   (I'm still getting back up to speed on using this app since it's been a while - quickest way to make straight 40 Hz will be to just create a New session).
« Last Edit: 2016-12-15, 07:08:54 by e2matrix »
   
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Mindroid has so many options it is really almost exactly like having one of the Theta technologies $349 Mind's Eye devices.   I've got both and it works the same magic.   I've had some really incredible experiences with the Voyager (Mind's Eye) and this Android app.    You can choose the color of the flashing lights, choose binaural or regular, audio-visual or visual only (or audio only), duration and you can directly edit the frequency just by pulling a line on the frequency graph with your finger.  You can even use external LED glasses with it if you want (like the ones they sell at Theta technologies  ( http://thetatechnologies.com/ ).   But you don't really need those and I'd suggest just getting the virtual 3D goggles like everyone is selling now at Walmart, eBay, china sites like dhgate.com, aliexpress.com etc.   
    After a little more checking on external glasses I'm not sure if the Theta tech ones would work - but the Mindroid app has info on where to get ones that will work with the app - they have both a sleep mask type and sunglasses type.   But as I said they aren't especially needed - just lay the smartphone on your face or get the virtual goggles for cheap. 
« Last Edit: 2016-12-15, 06:37:01 by e2matrix »
   
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I guess I'm really on this as I know some people that can use this too.   I just created a 60 minute session that is straight 40 Hz.   It is actually a little difficult to draw the line on exactly 40 Hz with a finger so I used one of those screen pens.   You can do it manually but you'd have to type 40.0 sixty times in the editor.  I was going to upload my saved session here but after looking into where Mindroid stores it's session files it looks like you will need a rooted phone to put my saved session onto your phone so it may be easier to just make your own with a steady finger or screen pen on the 40 Hz line.
   
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I guess I'm really on this as I know some people that can use this too.   I just created a 60 minute session that is straight 40 Hz.   It is actually a little difficult to draw the line on exactly 40 Hz with a finger so I used one of those screen pens.   You can do it manually but you'd have to type 40.0 sixty times in the editor.  I was going to upload my saved session here but after looking into where Mindroid stores it's session files it looks like you will need a rooted phone to put my saved session onto your phone so it may be easier to just make your own with a steady finger or screen pen on the 40 Hz line.

I downloaded Mindroid to my smartphone (Samsung Note 4, has a pen) and will play with it. Thank you for the information.

As for the LEDs: I will try to only light a LED very dimly (high series resistor), may be it goes ON and OFF faster. I have several types of LEDs and will experiment with some. High power LEDs are the worst concerning afterglow. May be the 3 mA LEDs are better for flickering.

Greetings, Conrad
   
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Demonstration of short, bright LED pulses for strobes on the MHOP project:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6amIEYDDFOM

These strobes require fast turn-on and turn-off so as not to produce blurred or streaky images and to make a good "stop motion" strobe effect. For extremely short bright pulses you need to provide more than the usual voltage to the LED. I used a monostable 555 timer circuit as a "pulse shortener" to trim the pulses.

   
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I downloaded Mindroid to my smartphone (Samsung Note 4, has a pen) and could set it to 40 Hz. The sound seems to indicate that it really is 40 Hz. But I can only do it with two big red dots on the screen. Other colors are not possible with the free version of Mindroid.

It looks like the screen of my Smartphone is fast enough, I see some black as the big red dots are flickering on and off (see the attached photo of my smartphone running Mindroid, the free version, only red dots).

I have to download a development system for my Windows PC which allows to write programs for Android smart phones. The program should allow to set the duty cycle when displaying a dot or other shapes flickering at 40 Hz on the screen. And of course one wants to experiment with different colors.

But it will take some time to write the program for my smart phone. A few years ago I wrote a few silly programs for my old smart phone and the learning curve was steep.

Greetings, Conrad
   
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I tried TinselKoala's idea of very short pulses:

The duty cycle was set to 0.1% at 40 Hz, which means that the pulses were 25µs long.

The function generator was set to 10 V square wave, offset 5 V. I did not need a series resistor in front of the LED.

I tried several LEDs (2 mA red and green and 20 mA blue and white) and none seemed to flicker at the above settings. May be one can not see it with the eyes. A measurement with a photo diode or photo transistor might show the flickering.

With a series resistor and a duty cycle of 30% to 50% the LEDs showed some flickering, but it looked like an intensity flicker and not ON/OFF.

I will go with the idea of a program for the Android smart phone.

A simple LED circuit is probably too crude. One should find out which LEDs and which set up were used in the original experiment.

Greetings, Conrad
   
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The tone() function for Arduino can be used to set a square wave at specific frequency and 50 percent duty cycle easily. Lower limit on most Arduino AVR boards is 31 Hz.  The pulse shortener circuit I posted above can then be used to make the individual pulses shorter and with higher voltage delivered to the LEDs. 

https://www.arduino.cc/en/Reference/Tone

So you could put a potentiometer for controlling the frequency in the range, say, of 31 to 50 Hz, and the trimpot on the pulse shortener circuit will control the duty cycle to a short value.

Something like:

Code: [Select]
tone(LEDpin,(map(analogRead(potPin),0,1023,31,50)));
should do the trick.


If the pulse shortener circuit pulses are too short for this purpose, the capacitor values can be changed.
   
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You might also consider using a traditional xenon flashlamp strobe. Although they do produce an annoying buzzing noise and involve high voltages ...

   
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Code: [Select]

/********************************************************
LED flickerer by TK

Connect potentiometer (5 or 10k) between GND and +5V pins
with wiper to pin A0

Connect LED anode to pin 8, cathode to 1k resistor to GND.

To see flickering when set to midrange (about 40Hz) turn off
room lights and move fingers in front of LED.

For investigational use only, no medical claims made.
********************************************************/


int LEDpin, potPin;

void setup() {
LEDpin=8;
pinMode(LEDpin, OUTPUT);
potPin=A0;
pinMode(potPin, INPUT);
}

void loop() {

tone(LEDpin,(map(analogRead(potPin),0,1023,31,50)));

}

   

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This is turning out to be quite a challenging project.

In the Old Days we would have used an incandescent
bulb for the light source and some sort of small motor
driven shutter to interrupt the light to produce flicker.

Where colored light was needed a colored filter would
be used.

A more modern type of shutter might be fashioned from
an older monochrome lcd display if it has sufficient response.

Or some LEDs mounted behind a fan such that the blades
of the fan would interrupt the beams.  Varying the speed
of rotation suitably would require some thought... 


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The animal mind ALWAYS reacts to what it does not understand. This is what sets dogs barking. If you are going to tell the truth, you are going to have to be okay with barking dogs, because they will harry your passage until you pass through town.
Les Visible - 27 February 2020
   
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