PopularFX
Home Help Search Login Register
Welcome,Guest. Please login or register.
2021-04-12, 07:36:05
News: A feature is available which provides a place all members can chat, either publicly or privately.
There is also a "Shout" feature on each page. Only available to members.

Pages: [1] 2 3 4 5
Author Topic: AVEC Replication Attempt  (Read 72432 times)
Group: Moderator
Full Member
*****

Posts: 163
Sup, I'm going to try to replicate the AVEC device.

I've been collecting some parts to complete the build:

40 awg wire for the inner coil on the CCUs, this wire has a very high resistance, about 1 ohm per foot, it's extremely fragile so I'm planning on using a coil winder to make the coils as similar as possible.




Next is a 4kv dc to dc converter, this will convert 0 - 15 VDC to 0-4kv VDC, which should give us plenty of room to meet the 1kv voltage drop requirement (assuming the rise time on the pulse circuitry is quick enough).



I've purchased a high voltage probe to see the pulse waveform and verify the rise time will meet the specification.



The batteries for the individual CCU tests are 4x 7.5Ah 12V and 2x 5Ah 12V.



Some tape to isolate the inner CCU coil from the outer SEP coil, I don't know if this will be needed, but it's nice to have. This will insulate up to 69kV.



Some assorted litz wire and 20 awg wire for SEP coils and maybe an output coil in the future.



Finally, I have some equipment to do some initial tests with.



I hope to have the coil winder completed soon, then the first CCU coil and SEP coil.

The first test will be to pulse one coil and see if we can see the affect the ether has on the battery or pickup coil. According to AAA, it should be a few volts on a battery, or a series of high voltage pulses.
« Last Edit: 2012-09-02, 01:46:28 by bte »
   

Group: Administrator
Hero Member
*****

Posts: 3809


Buy me some coffee
bte
When we do replications we tend to put them in our own work bench, so i have created one and moved it their.

Good luck.
PS you can delete this post once you have read it  O0
« Last Edit: 2012-09-02, 09:50:57 by Peterae »
   
Group: Moderator
Full Member
*****

Posts: 163
Awesome. Thanks!
« Last Edit: 2012-09-02, 09:51:15 by Peterae »
   
Group: Moderator
Full Member
*****

Posts: 163
Life is so busy sometimes. What a shame.

This week I have some plastic coming in, I'm building some bobbins to wind on. 1 1/2" HDPE rod for the center with 1/16" HDPE sheet for the sides.

My scope is not fast enough to adequately measure the pulse rise time. I'll have to make do without it. My concern is the avalanche transistor strings failing and melting one of the coils.

I have a 50 volt capacitor for the lower level, in addition I'm using a SEP coil per the document. The idea is to keep the pulse from going near zero volts at any point.

I haven't seen enough bench work for this device, why? It's a blueprint for a working device. Nothing about it is complex, with the exception of the pulse circuitry perhaps.

Voltages don't need to be rediculous, the build just needs to be done carefully. Single coil test results will follow shortly.

I hope others work on this with me! I'd like to do a team effort build someday.
   

Group: Administrator
Hero Member
*****

Posts: 3809


Buy me some coffee
I think your rep will be the first public replication, i do know a private group got together and tried building the device without results, there should be some on this forum that can expand on their attempt, i personally did not try building this device, although i did try his other device, i forget what it was called now but it was pyramid shaped.

I am not sure it would be a good idea for you to even look at the previous replication in case you pick up tips from a non working device.  :-\
   
Group: Moderator
Full Member
*****

Posts: 163
Is there a link or any information on their attempts? I'm more interested to know what roadblocks they ran into during the replication.
   

Group: Administrator
Hero Member
*****

Posts: 3809


Buy me some coffee
I think either Grumpy or giantkiller may know more details.
   
Group: Guest
Is there a link or any information on their attempts? I'm more interested to know what roadblocks they ran into during the replication.

Our adviser departed before it was made clear how to best harness the energy, before completing the design, and long before anyone had anything built.  He was not around to advise when the first were ready to experiment.  Many first attempts had shortcuts that violated design requirements such as material type: NO metal within 5 foot radius (except your copper coils) and ONLY NON-polar polymers are allowed.  Some of the advice was very fussy indeed.  Then, one day, it all just
   

Group: Elite Experimentalist
Hero Member
*****

Posts: 1434
Frequency equals matter...


Buy me a drink
I did not build because of the constraints. What I did was focus on the angular vectors and the signal protocols. It is like a multiTesla coil rig/ECD with the Keely/Hutchison type wave vectors. I see great possibilities in this configuration. The configuration was setup up for a specific capture. Like Rosphere stated that Spherics just disappeared. The AVEC represents a static set of physical coil angles matched with a static set of timing protocols against a known set of materials. If you want simplicity then try the iron wire build that EX showed. This leads to the Kunel patent which uses the weak field in space for control. The AVEC is the process of a force against a material target including a magnetic field.

Instead of me continuing on of history the best advice I could give is to be wary of complex builds first. We all have shelves of them. From your previous posts it sounds like you lack some necessary equipment too. We have advice there too. If you are using simple equipment and burning nylon you will eventually hurt yourself.

The bad news is complexity. The good news is insight gained. Just my 2cents.

With that stated:
There were 3 documents released at the same time frame. They are the ECD, ERfinder's Compwave process, and the AVEC. One of these docs has the hydrogen bomb picture on the front. This is important because the canister has coax running to multiple tap points. The author was pointing out the heterodyning of multiple vectors. Muy importante here! You get this and the rest is cake. Kapeesh?
« Last Edit: 2013-01-31, 05:42:13 by giantkiller »


---------------------------
   
Group: Guest

Hi Bte, you seem to invest time and money in a real project. I appreciate this pro-active and positive approach and will follow your work with interest.
Could you advise us about good links and practical documents about the AVEC device?

   
Group: Moderator
Full Member
*****

Posts: 163
Follow the instructions as closely as possible in the AVEC document, it's really a gold mine of information. I'm not following it exactly (I'm using 40 awg wire instead of the recommended 32 or 33 awg) but the higher resistance and more space for extra windings will only help, if the information presented is accurate.

I have a pulse circuit almost ready that allows for nanosecond delays of each individual coil as well as extremely short pulse widths (pico-second range), which is probably overkill. The 40 awg wire makes the short pulse width requirement steeper, though. You should be able to see the effect with voltages much lower than 4kv or 1kv for that matter.

So, if I want to use a SEP I have to sacrifice winding space for the input coil, which means less resistance and less inductance, which means shorter pulse widths. If I use a capacitor with a set voltage (say 500 volts) and switch a higher voltage (say, 900 volts) I can use the 500 volt level (which is present on the coil at all times) in place of a SEP coil, which means more room for more windings, higher inductance, and allows the pulse width to be slightly longer.

In the end I'm going to try a combination of both. I'm shooting for 3,000 feet of 40awg per coil. If I can't fit it into the space I need I'll tweak the bobbins a bit. 500V / 3000 ohms = around 160 millamps, spread across 6 input coils = 28mA per coil, which is under the current limit of 90mA for 40awg wire. I'm hoping that I can squeeze some more length out of the space I have.

Even if I go the SEP route, I'll have an offset voltage of about 50 - 100 volts to keep the waveform from reaching zero. Protection diodes will be used to stop the HV from the input coils from going into the SEP coil.

Everything will be made out of HDPE (I haven't been able to find a resource on which plastics are polorized and which aren't) and bolted in place (with nylon bolts).

EDIT:
My current calculation per coil is wrong, it will be 160mA per coil, so I'll have to have a coil with more resistance.
« Last Edit: 2013-02-04, 14:27:50 by bte »
   
Group: Guest
@bte

Maybe I missed something. Where is the "AVEC document"? Is there a link?

   

Group: Administrator
Hero Member
*****

Posts: 3809


Buy me some coffee
Ex
Here's a link to the disclosure thread  O0
http://www.overunityresearch.com/index.php?topic=369.0
   

Group: Elite Experimentalist
Hero Member
*****

Posts: 1434
Frequency equals matter...


Buy me a drink


---------------------------
   
Group: Guest
@Peterae and @giantkiller

Thanks for the links!

   
Group: Elite
Hero Member
******

Posts: 3541
It's turtles all the way down
I believe user "ronotte" (Roberto Notte) from Italy did one or two excellent builds of the AVEC device. He spent a lot of his own money doing this, had a very well equipped lab. I believe his results were inconclusive.

His info was on the old builders site, I have since lost the link.

He has some videos on youtube, but they are TPU related.


---------------------------
"Secrecy, secret societies and secret groups have always been repugnant to a free and open society"......John F Kennedy
   
Group: Moderator
Full Member
*****

Posts: 163
That's very unfortunate, I would have loved to see what he tried and what issues he ran into.
   

Group: Elite Experimentalist
Hero Member
*****

Posts: 1434
Frequency equals matter...


Buy me a drink
He is live on skype most days. Check you clock for Italy time reference.


---------------------------
   
Group: Moderator
Full Member
*****

Posts: 163
Looking into some saturable reactor cores. It's been tough to find one with a square enough "switch on" curve. I might need to rethink my design. I like the idea of a saturable reactor because they aren't as sensitive as transistors or mosfets and seem ideal in a circuit where high voltage spikes and the like regularly occur.

Any inputs on using these devices?
   
Group: Moderator
Full Member
*****

Posts: 163
Two pulses, of differing voltages, phased offset slightly, should produce the equivalent of a pulse of larger voltage. So, the two differing voltages can be something a little easier to handle with a mosfet or transistor. The resulting pulse can be compressed with a saturable reactor (or two, or three), giving us the pulse amplitude and width we want.
   
Group: Guest
bte,

You can exercise some control over the hysteresis of a core by adding a control winding with bias applied to that winding. The bias need not be DC or any particular wave shape. It all depends upon how and when you wish the curve to change.

Even with such control your curve is limited to the core's curve.
 
   
Group: Moderator
Full Member
*****

Posts: 163
I read a very good paper on magnetic switches, the math is a bit heavy. It boils down to thin laminations of nickel-iron alloy and low total inductance for the individual stages. Each stage increases the voltage by 2 and the saturable transformers are reversed biased so that they do not saturate too early in the switching process. The goal would be a solid state switch, switching around 400 - 600 volts, 3 stages of step up saturable transformers, increasing the voltage to around 4.8kv. There is no longer a need for a snubber (current and voltage across the switch drop to zero during switching). The transformer chain needs to have each stage reverse biased during the pulse cycle to "switch" and isolate properly. This is the most reliable solution, but the math is pretty hard.

The magnetic switches should have reset time as low as 5ns. I hope that is quick enough!
   
Group: Moderator
Full Member
*****

Posts: 163
This is the basic schematic outlined in the paper, by reverse saturating specific transformers at specific times during the pulse cycle, they will act as switches in addition to compressing and amplifying (voltage wise) the pulse.

Im working on calculating the values given the cores I have to work with. Anyone here good with math? It would help if someone could check my work, which I will be posting shortly.

I dont have the money for tape wound cores (1000 dollars a pop!), but I imagine they would work much better. I have ferrite cores which should still work OK.

The end goal with this pulsing arrangement is using a conventional solid state switch to switch a large, low voltage (relatively) current instead of a high voltage, small current. This lowers the requirements of the switching element. Second, the need for a snubber is practically eliminated, due to the characteristics of this circuit, there is effectively zero inductance at saturation, the switch will not see any back EMF. Still, a simple diode should provide adequate protection from any glitches. Our switch will not need to handle high voltage, and it wont need to switch quickly, all of this is taken care of by the saturable transformer stages.

Note: C1 should be parallel with T1, not in series as I have it drawn. Sorry!
« Last Edit: 2013-05-23, 15:24:50 by bte »
   
Group: Guest
bte,

What paper are you referring to? Can you post a link?

A saturable core reactor that saturates at the second half of the resonant cycle?
L3 bypasses your CCU 'until' it saturates? When it saturates it will bypass your CCU because its inductance is at a minimum.

   
Group: Moderator
Full Member
*****

Posts: 163
bte,

What paper are you referring to? Can you post a link?

A saturable core reactor that saturates at the second half of the resonant cycle?
L3 bypasses your CCU 'until' it saturates? When it saturates it will bypass your CCU because its inductance is at a minimum.



Yes, the core is configured until it saturates at the end of the energy transfer from C1 to C2. The secondary of T1, now positively saturated again, falls back down to zero impedance, reversing the current and unsaturating T2, C2 cannot flow back to C1 at this point, and instead transfers energy to C3 through the reverse saturated L3 until it unsaturates (T2 is resaturated at this point) and C3 is dumped through the high impedance CCU.

The math is pretty complex but I really need to figure out the correct values, this configuration is the most complex, but the most reliable and fault tolerant. Magnetic switches really are amazing. The currents need to be relatively high for the inductors to saturate properly, the CCU still uses almost no current. The leakage current is beneficial because it prevents the CCU from "glitching" down to zero volts at any point.

The reset time is critical, and must be short enough so that the circuit is ready for the next pulse. I need to figure out how to deal with the left over energy from the T2 <-> L3 oscillations. L3 is needed as stated before for a low impedance path for the charging of C3, and it needs to saturate right at the end of the energy transfer so that the CCU experiences the highest voltage spike in the lowest amount of time, dictated by the time it takes for L3 to unsaturate.

Wow, this is alot of engineering. Am I overdoing this?

Here are the papers:

Very detailed, lots of math:
www.dtic.mil/dtic/tr/fulltext/u2/a338977.pdf

Basic magnetic switch configurations and explanation:
www.jeet.or.kr/ltkpsweb/pub/pubfpfile.aspx?ppseq=97
   
Pages: [1] 2 3 4 5
« previous next »


 

Home Help Search Login Register
Theme © PopularFX | Based on PFX Ideas! | Scripts from iScript4u 2021-04-12, 07:36:05