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Author Topic: Aether Vortex Energy Converter (AVEC Device): Full Disclosure  (Read 207495 times)
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I reread the paper again. Are there SM emails is addition to the public ones? Does anyone have a copy?
   
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I reread the paper again. Are there SM emails is addition to the public ones? Does anyone have a copy?
       Just so you know, guys, the 'Web address above won't run on this borrowed library computer I'm using.   Something about the file name or possibly data format is incompatible with the operating system of this desktop terminal.

Also, I don't have more time to look through all the posts on this thread, but can a wiring diagram be provided by anyone?

--Lee
   

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I reread the paper again. Are there SM emails is addition to the public ones? Does anyone have a copy?

which paper?

I don't think all of the SM emails are public.  As far as recall, SM never gave up anything definitive and exact, except for stating that Tao "has the secret" when Tao was talking about Tesla's Radiant electric discharges.  SM stated from the start that he could only share info by analogies and no exact info.



   

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      Just so you know, guys, the 'Web address above won't run on this borrowed library computer I'm using.   Something about the file name or possibly data format is incompatible with the operating system of this desktop terminal.

Also, I don't have more time to look through all the posts on this thread, but can a wiring diagram be provided by anyone?

--Lee


Which web address are you referring to?

Look at the first post that I made in this thread on page 1.  This post has several files, download all of them.
There are 3 wiring and assembly diagrams.  The main pdf has these.

Spherics showed a basic schematic with snubber for using MOSFETs to drive the coils.  MOSFETs are not required.
   
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Electrons are small magnets. If you think about long time you will realize TPU was not a rocket science.
   
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Which web address are you referring to?

Look at the first post that I made in this thread on page 1.  This post has several files, download all of them.
There are 3 wiring and assembly diagrams.  The main pdf has these.

Spherics showed a basic schematic with snubber for using MOSFETs to drive the coils.  MOSFETs are not required.
       Well, okay, I agree.   We're (possibly?) looking at different things, I think?
This was probably what I thought I meant:
       http://www.overunity.com/4728/is-lindsays-sm-a-fraud/390/#.VCSfB1dCzAl
And, it loads and runs as it should.

Now, as to your posted thread starter .PDF's...
       I did download and view some of them and the basic thing I see is what I like about Don Smith's research efforts:  Namely, the use of 'daughter' pickup coils around a central main, power transmitting driver coil, as depicted in...

* M9_nanosecond scr switch.pdf

...the above .PDF file in your original post.   If you look at the diagrams, you should see what I mean by what I refer to above.   Pg. 1 has a transformer with power secondary coils on the other side of the primary coil, as shown on Page 1, Figure 1 of the .PDf

Smith merely separates the pickup coils from the transformer coil and sets it off a short distance from the primary.   Here's what I mean, exactly...
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CXZoaznnuhg&list=FL46LHvaXTY6u2pHFYpfdtgw&index=1

Don Smith was researching the same principle, I think.   If so, I agree.   Any number of coils can be set off from a central transmitting coil and power taken(tapped) from the outlying coils.   So they might not be overunity?   Fine, but the concept works in the video and should work with distinct wire coils.

That was me original point of this set of posts I'm uploading.

--Lee
   

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The AVEC is quite different from anything else you will find.  Essentially, it utilizes another mode of induction to induce a DC current in the collector coils. This mode of induction, lacking the inherent limitations of conventional Faraday induction, can be adjusted to run with gain.  I had hoped to release more about it this year, but with the commitments of home, work, and school I don't have a great deal of free time.
   
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The Radiant Induction effect seems to provide a sort of coupling effect even when it shouldn't be possible given the angle. I've heard that it "pushes" and "pulls" electrons through the wire via the abrupt discharges, causing a slight heating effect. I'm not sure how the gain mechanism works, but given a cascading pattern, it appears. It appears easier with a DC solenoid wrapped around the device.

I think that this is really the only way to get a serious alternative energy source. I'm rebuilding my controller box to deal with the different configurations. (AVEC, flat TPU coil(s), Tetra). I have two 0-500v DC supplies for bifilars, pulse wdith and delay timing for each winding, and I can drive up to 20Mhz if I replace MOSFETs with a better driving mechanism, say avalanche transistors.
   

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Several people made very nice assemblies of the coils.  Some even had coils wound by a winding shop - sweet stuff indeed.

But they never finished building it.

I'd love to see a bifilar at 500v with Peter's controller....As I adjusted the delay by picoseconds, the whole house vaporized!  (joking...)
   

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I think that this is really the only way to get a serious alternative energy source.

I agree.
   
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My new homemade controller has 4 channels for the tetra with an extra delay channel per main channel to drive a bifilar (flat SM coil) configuration. The power supply for it was tough to design, I wanted it to be stiff for high frequency driving. I have 8 separate adjustable 500 volt DC-DC converters (one per coil winding) and 8 MOSFET driving DC-DC converters. The controller can wind up to 20Mhz, I used RF MOSFETS. I really want to up the voltage, 500 volts seems like a low target.
   
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It's turtles all the way down
A very capable Italian researcher with username "ronotte"  which was short for Roberto Notte did in fact very carefully build the full device as outlined by Sperics. I believe he also worked closely at one point with user "OTTO" on the ECD.

AFAIK, his results were inconclusive. He has a very well equipped lab and his build was very professional. You may still be able to find his videos for this device on youtube or maybe someone else saved them.

some info here: http://www.overunity.com/2240/ronottes-amazing-tpu-experiments/nowap/

This is some early TPU experiments, pre-Spheric. Search his username for more leads.

I may have archived some of the photos, will have to look.

regards, ION

EDIT: OK just checked, I have archived a lot of "Ronotte's photos of his Spheric's (AVEC) build. I have 31 MB of Ronotte's photos and other stuff, where can I post them? Don't want to use up too much server space here.

Looking at some of the photo's, his was an amazing build complete with custom routed aluminum enclosures for the pulse drivers.
I believe Mark Snowswell was also involved in replication, as some of the pulse circuitry was contributed by him.


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"Secrecy, secret societies and secret groups have always been repugnant to a free and open society"......John F Kennedy
   

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That's a great start.  You can follow the testing that Roberto did.  He is still around and you may want to contact him.  Before the big falling out with the group on the builders forum, Roberto had created a large document of his work on the spherics TPU.  As I recall, his max voltage was just under the minimum to meet the 1500v drop requirement.

I use EMCO DC-DC converter bricks for power supplies, and an old adjustable 1000v dc-dc converter (only 1 ma) for transistor testing.

Another approach might be to put a call out to everyone with an uncompleted unit, and there are several, and perhaps send them controllers or at least a good schematic and parts list for one.  The controller was the limiting factor for most people. The 1500v requirement put it at the top of the MOSFET range.

Rosphere has a very nice assembly.

At the time that Roberto was building and testing, I was using a 10kv setup with a sparkgap and all sort of wierd charging and arcing was occurring - just as Elihu Thomson and Joseph Henry had first witnessed, referenced by Tesla, and later replicated by him and further developed.  I could feel the field around coils that I impulsed out to 3 feet.
   

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I think the CCU wiring schematic has an error, and the capacitor isolation switches should be on the vertical lines going to the capacitor, else they disconnect the CCU's from the battery.

Also, I used DPDT switches for all three switch groups, but have not updated the schematic for this yet.

   
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I have a massive buffer capacitor in place across the bias coil(s). It takes about 3 seconds to discharge completely at 2 amps. To ensure the bias field winds down somewhat slowly. To top off the capacitor that feeds the system I have a double buffered capacitor setup for feedback. As long as the output never directly feeds the input, it's stable. I haven't tried a direct approach because I have not tested how fast the runaway event occurs. I assume it is immediate so I simply never allow it to happen.
   

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I have a massive buffer capacitor in place across the bias coil(s). It takes about 3 seconds to discharge completely at 2 amps. To ensure the bias field winds down somewhat slowly. To top off the capacitor that feeds the system I have a double buffered capacitor setup for feedback. As long as the output never directly feeds the input, it's stable. I haven't tried a direct approach because I have not tested how fast the runaway event occurs. I assume it is immediate so I simply never allow it to happen.

I use a 500uF poly cap. 

What do you mean by: "To top off the capacitor that feeds the system I have a double buffered capacitor setup for feedback."

I would stay away from a direct approach.  We don't want to read about you in the news.
   
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I use a 500uF poly cap. 

What do you mean by: "To top off the capacitor that feeds the system I have a double buffered capacitor setup for feedback."

I would stay away from a direct approach.  We don't want to read about you in the news.


Input cap -> Switch A -> Buffer Cap -> Switch B -> Buffer Cap -> Switch C -> Output

It's a chain of PWM switches with some safety logic to ensure they never bridge the input to the output at the same time. I think I overcomplicated it.

I agree on the direct approach.
   

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Is that decoupled from the output?

If you use a separate power source for the static coils (i.e. batteries) then they can never be directly connected.  Cold current will keep the batteries charge, if present.
   
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I use one power source. That rough circuit description is the decoupling mechanism to keep the capacitors charged without connecting the output back to the input. I made a mistake in the description, swap input and output. I have protection diodes and overvoltage circuitry that trips the rotation circuit in the event the switches fail in a closed state for some reason.
   

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One new CCU control box finished.  Will try to get the other one finished this weekend.
   
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I've got some new delay boards I'm having fabricated currently.
   

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that's a good idea.

Bellow is a re-post of Spheric's comments on build accuracy:

Question posed to Spherics:

>Hi XXX,
>
>I'm still working on the control circuit for the coil and had a couple
>of questions to ask you. Exactly how accurate does the phase-shifting
>for the rotating field need to be? The controller circuit that I am
>building uses some shift registers to divide the clock input and produce
>the three output phases 120 degrees shifted. Below is the circuit that I
>have come up with so far. The way it is setup, you can use the pulse
>width of the input clock to control the pulse width of all three output
>channels simultaneously:

Page 71
>I found that the circuit could run up to at least 5 MHz without
>glitching and allows us to use a single pulse width control component
to
>control the outputs for all three channels simultaneously. However, I
am
>concerned about the phase-shift/delay fine-tuning.
>
>You mentioned that the phase-shift has to be accurate for the rotating
>field to be setup correctly. Coming out of the shift register, the
>timing for each channel is accurate to within 0.5 ns. but by the time
>the signal goes through the driver ICs and input lines to the coils,
>there could be significant delays of 10s of nanoseconds. My questions
is
>how precise is precise enough for the effect to work without destroying
>the effect? If we need to fine-tune the output delays, I found some
>8-bit delay line ICs that can adjust the the delays to within 0.25 ns of
>the output up to a max delay of 80 ns. But before I toss these onto the
>circuit, I thought i would ask you to see if this is really necessary or
>simply overkill. What methods did you use to design the timing circuitry
>for your controller?

Spherics's answer to question:

April 2008
I'm away on a course so this is a quick reply. With pulses although we talk of a phase shift we are talking of the time between the start of one pulse and the start of the next pulse as being the same between each successive pulse, in an ideal world. If you are using the same type of drive components and type of mosfets, have high tolerance resistors and capacitors, and keep wire lengths between components as short as possible but consistent between each driver circuit, mitigating impedance and capacitance effects of the wires, the delays to all three coils should be almost identical. So even if there is 50 nanosecond delay, if it's the same delay to each coil then it's not a problem. Even a difference of 10-30 nanoseconds between coils will not dissappoint in terms of output energy and cold elec effects.
Let's take a typical poor-build. Each coil has different widths out by 1/8inch or more. The coils are wrapped until either the spool is empty or it just seems the right height. The length of wire between coils varies by 15-20% at least. These coils will require independant delays of hundreds of nanoseconds and increases in pulse width of hundreds of nanoseconds to get a *consistent* output. But even without adjustment they'll get output, however the amplitude of that output will come in waves and not be as high as it could be, and the amount of input energy used will be much higher due to the much longer pulse widths. They will be unlikely to get a consistent cold energy output, the lightbulbs in the SEP circuit, may ebb and glow slightly. It may or may not be overunity but possibly only by 10%. All exciting stuff but it's not a setup that is going anywhere. It is not really utilising any flow of cold electricity, just bursts here and there. i.e. because the pattern is not building up, it is occuring only in waves, and is relatively feable, i.e. there is no 'resonance' in the ether.
In answer to your question if you build your coils carefully and locate them precisely and rigidly, I would not bother with the delay line components. At a later date for reference:
These are useful for pulse width:
http://www.datadelay.com/datasheets/3d7608.pdf
These are useful for delay lines as you use a screwdriver:
http://www.datadelay.com/asp/variable.asp
Switch mode power supply chips can be useful for driving 3 or 6 coils as 3 pairs. Such as:
http://ww1.microchip.com/downloads/en/DeviceDoc/70178C.pdf
   
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I should note that my two current builds are:

3 phase flat SM style coil with four SEPs (two bifilar windings) and an output coil.

The tetra TPU with encompassing SEP coil.

My tetra coils are not identical due to the automated winder I had.
   

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These are the batteries I have:

http://www.batterymart.com/p-12v-7ah-sealed-lead-acid-battery-f2.html

Got to figure out some delay elements.

I was looking at these, but they are like $50 each:
http://www.datadelay.com/datasheets/1503.pdf

I'll have to look at the inductor and capacitor values for the 1 to 100ns range and see if I can use some small trimmer caps and small inductors (or even wind some).

This may work:
http://www.rhombus-ind.com/dlcat/app1_pas.pdf

   

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It's the speed at which the coils are sequentially switched that's the problem, 3kHz is not good enough, i found this with the Tetra, i needed at least 1MHz rotation speed.

What happened at 1MHz?
   
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