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Author Topic: Simple Electrical Conversion Circuit  (Read 2352 times)
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Posts: 45
Hey Jerry,

that was my first thought when I was reading your concern. O0

When you talk about "This circuit is the key" what are you referring to ?
I have two of these beer sign transformer in my stock ( had however to look up this term first, because we simply call them
Neotransformers  :) )

The Problem I see with these transformer is that they need grid-supply although the output-scection of the circuit is non-grounded...direct inductive output. I was talking years ago to the supplier and asked him about the output-stage as the transformer-case is sealed and I could not have a look at it.
They were mainly designed for Geissler-Tubes and are still available. I had bought them for Hydrogen-Spectral-Tubes at that time.

So a transformer like this with off-grid-supply would be preferable.

Also I had a short read here:

http://www.quantum-chemistry-history.com/Kron_Dat/Kron-1945/Kron-JAP-1945/Kron-JAP-1945.htm

If you scroll down to NETS you will find that Kron had the correct, complete model defining all necessary variables of a NET
and this includes -b as a REAL negative resistance.
If a scientist does not have a complete Model, missing elements then he will not discover it and going to great lengths arguing against the existence of what he has left out.....self fulfilling prophecy.....just that simple

Mike
   
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Posts: 35
Hi Mike,

If you've got two of those transformers, you're set to go.  Use a simple T-tap circuit to feed each capacitor. A 10 turn, half inch air core charging inductor will give you a higher potential on one of the two caps, for an offset.  The output from one cap is bent at 60°.  This circuit is the key to powering crop circle electrodes, and can open a parallel technology.

The dominators have everything organized and explained just right so everything stays bound within the confines of their imposed reference frame, everything staying copacetic.

With a resistor, voltage goes up as the current goes down.  With a load, the power stays the same.

With a negative resistor, current goes up as voltage goes down.  Does the power stay the same?  Kron's writing was highly censored.  It's unlikely he could have slipped in any factors showing something unexpected.  We have to experiment to find it.

Gabriel Kron had a circuit with which applied power increased, to drive a heavy load.  The only clues we have are his open connection comment and reports about negative resistance.

Being the second greatest electrician, it's possible Kron understood negative resistance from a perspective beyond commonly available knowledge.  Philo Farnsworth also did some work in this area, finding that a certain region of the working voltage graph was accociated with negative resistance arising from secondary electron emission.  And when I pull plate current from the grid of the 1Q3, the filament goes from red to bright yellow, so there's some secondaries right there.



   
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Posts: 35
The Greek letter Omega represents the womb, which is the beginning. (alpha is broken infinity, the end).  Omega is the beginning.  So take a narrow strip of foil and bend it into a 3D Omega electrode which has a little height.  Now send some converted energy around the strip.  Hook the Omega electrode's output to a heavy mass, to insure the static flows. 

As the static flows around the loop, a bundle of flux lines will come up out of the electrode.  And it is possible to make the bundle open outwards on the end, curving into a funnel shaped like our space/time (sic) graph.  All you need is a second Omega electrode above the first, wired in series.  The funnel gradient accelerates electrostic charges.  This increases potential.
   
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Posts: 45
Hey Jerry,

I have two different transformer one with 4 the other with 9 kv, so I only can use on and connected to the grid,
can you please give me a simple circuit-drawing for one transformer ?

....because I do not understand exactly what you mean here :

Quote
f you've got two of those transformers, you're set to go.  Use a simple T-tap circuit to feed each capacitor. A 10 turn, half inch air core charging inductor will give you a higher potential on one of the two caps, for an offset.  The output from one cap is bent at 60°.  This circuit is the key to powering crop circle electrodes, and can open a parallel technology.

Concerning the -b I wonder where this open-path is hidden in this Video-Demonstration,  verpies was showing here:

https://www.overunityresearch.com/index.php?topic=4181.msg95041#msg95041

Since this circuit certainly has no high-voltage, its my guess that the -b is in the time-domain, meaning many small steps of
inductive storage and releasing it backwards or we have something going on in the base-emitter-diode while its reversed-biased...but that's off-topic here

Mike
   
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Posts: 35
Good news, Mike, you've basically got what you need to build my setup.  The layout is shown in message number 10 on the first page ("10").  The circuit itself is shown in "18", and "11" shows how to use both of your transformers.  Since you already have two different potentials, you don't need the boost inductor on one of the FWBRs.  The output resistor doesn't have to be precision, but it has to handle the power of the total milliamps.

Regular diodes, pointing towards the cap, will still produce the static.  And the circuit will work without a bridge rectifier, but will only be half as efficient.
   
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Posts: 45
Jerry,

that would mean that I need a rectifier-tube and a 10 KV Cap both of which I have not yet managed to get.
Have to work with a lower voltage first. Had built some years ago an Mot-bases Kacher which will output 1.5 Kv at 7 KHz.
I grinded the I-part of the core off and put a airgap in place, so it runs in the Kilo-Herz range ( core is singing like a bird :) )
I am restricted since I only have one of these microwave-oven caps and a few of the diodes.

Mike

   
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Posts: 35
One cap with a Mot is about the best way to convert the energy.
Make a spark gap the transformer will fire, then connect, a cap fastened to the oven diode, in parallel with the spark gap.
T-tap the circuit between the cap and diode.
Clothes hanger wire is a good high heat electrode, especially for the third spark gap point.
The T-tap wire doesn't have to go back to the spark gap

Not only that, but I acquired a 1500 W inductive cook top.
This is basically a high power ZVS driving a Litz Coil.
So I pigtailed it out with purple 10 gauge solid.
This appliance uses an oven diode.
The trick is how to T-tap the zvs, with the cap and diode reversed.  Add another diode after the output cap?
That's starting to look like the AV diode plug.  (EV Gray).

I'd say whatever works to produce the effect is the best thing to use.
« Last Edit: 2021-10-16, 15:25:57 by Jerry Volland »
   

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Hey Guys.

Take a look at this please.

https://youtu.be/wNBuUvHDe1k

Not sure if it has any relevance to this topic.

Cheers Grum.


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Nanny state ? Left at the gate !! :)
   
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Posts: 45
Grum

you did it ! O0 ...almost 7 years ago.

I say this although I am not quite sure because your setup was'nt structured enough  >:( to get a clear picture of your
wiring.

Would be interesting if you could remember the exact wiring and make a hand-scribble of this ?

Thanks Jerry. Interesting what you state here:

Quote
The T-tap wire doesn't have to go back to the spark gap

Not only that, but I acquired a 1500 W inductive cook top.
This is basically a high power ZVS driving a Litz Coil.
So I pigtailed it out with purple 10 gauge solid.
This appliance uses an oven diode.

How did you close the circuit with this inductive cook top if you did not lead the coil back to the spark-gap.
Did you connect it to the cap and let the end of the coil open a greater distance form the Sparkgap ?

Now I get the impression that this here is the secret of Kapadnaze and he was misleading the people all the time by stressing
the point of earth ground as the open path does not need it. Jerry said it very clear.

Yesterday a saw an extensive analysis ( part 3 ) of a russian guy ( Valentin Petkov, his youtube channel is his name) about the Stanley Meyer VIC-transformer-technique. After this it was clear that Meyer in open lectures had given false data about the puls-orientation ( among some other points ).
I suggest to archive these three vids.

Mike

   
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Grum
Quote
Hey Guys.
Take a look at this please.
https://youtu.be/wNBuUvHDe1k
Not sure if it has any relevance to this topic.
Cheers Grum.

I have done similar experiments and believe this effect relates to the Tesla hairpin circuit. The HV spark gap naturally has a HF component which can couple to any line capacitance producing shorter wavelengths. The HV diode also enhances the effect preventing the system resonance from coupling to the HV transformer resonance. If you measure the HV hash or noise from a distance there will be many HF elements present.

This was how Tesla could light a bulb in parallel with a dead short of much lesser resistance in the hairpin circuit. It's completely counterintuitive to what we would expect but the science behind it is sound.

Regards
AC




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Comprehend and Copy Nature... Viktor Schauberger

“Progress is impossible without change, and those who cannot change their minds cannot change anything.” George Bernard Shaw
   
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Posts: 35
https://youtu.be/wNBuUvHDe1k

Grum
I have done similar experiments and believe this effect relates to the Tesla hairpin circuit. The HV spark gap naturally has a HF component which can couple to any line capacitance producing shorter wavelengths. The HV diode also enhances the effect preventing the system resonance from coupling to the HV transformer resonance. If you measure the HV hash or noise from a distance there will be many HF elements present.

This was how Tesla could light a bulb in parallel with a dead short of much lesser resistance in the hairpin circuit. It's completely counterintuitive to what we would expect but the science behind it is sound.

Regards
AC

This is a pretty good analysis.  With phases going both ways, you can pretty much go phase to phase from any two points.

And I like the idea of grinding down the center core to get 7 kc.
What do we need to take off, half a mm?
I read one patent where he made a non linear inductance by grinding only part way across, leaving an original height shelf, or shoulder.
   
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Posts: 35

Thanks Jerry. Interesting what you state here: [The T-tap wire
doesn't have to go to the spark gap].

How did you close the circuit with this inductive cook top if you did not lead the coil back to the spark-gap.
Did you connect it to the cap and let the end of the coil open a greater distance form the Sparkgap ?

Mike

So far, all I've done with the cooktop is bring the hot wires out. I was waiting to work on it till I figure out hot to T-tap it. That's the benefit of discussion. Now it looks like just add an oven diode to the end of one of the wires, and T-tap it at that connection point.  The end of the diode could just go to the
Litz Coil, with only the T-tap wire coming out of the case.

The stray wire could go to one side of a hV cap which is shorted to a car battery,  (For rapid charge build up).
   
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Posts: 45
Jerry,

concerning grinding down the core: This is a misunderstanding because I used the wrong wording.
The core of the mircrowave-oven is an E-Core with an I on top to close the magnetic circuit. See attachment.
With the Microwave-Transformer Core,  the I is welded on the E from the outer side.
What I did you see here:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bwlc58YekZg

I was very careful in removing the I...you need to have good practice in handling the grinder to make a narrow and clean cut.

Ok, then I put a very thin plastic-foil ( 0.2 to 0.3 mm thick ) in between and reassembled the I and the E section using two long cable straps to attache them firmly. Later - after testing - you can glue it with epoxy.

By now you have created an airgap which makes it possible to use the transformer in an normal Kacher circuit( circuits are available in the web ). It performes in the KHz range.
I used the old work-horse 2N3055 at that time and it created about 1.5 KV ( depending of the voltage you use driving the transistor.

But because of the core-material which is designed for 50 t0 60 Hz this setup is not very efficient. Since I had no idea how this transformer will perform, I was a little careless and I killed one of my Tektronix Probes ( 120 $ down the drain ) :(
I had no 1:100 Probe ...was log time ago.

You will do much better with flybacks driving them with a pwm-controller because you can then adjust the output-voltage.
Of course you will need a flyback without built in diodes. That is the reason Grum had this weak effect....could have performed much better.

Mike
   

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Grum

you did it ! O0 ...almost 7 years ago.

I say this although I am not quite sure because your setup was'nt structured enough  >:( to get a clear picture of your
wiring.

Would be interesting if you could remember the exact wiring and make a hand-scribble of this ?


Mike

Hi Mike.

Attached is a sketch of the circuit, having watched my video a couple of times.

If it’s HF AC that’s needed then you could try the innards of a Plasma lamp, they have a small LOPT and only pull around 10 ma @ 12 volts. There’s also quite a few two wire automotive coils available too. They can be driven directly from a decent PWM.

I was surprised to hear the Lab cat Austin just at the end of the video, he used to spend hours sitting by my side. Pretty sure he wasn’t happy about the cameraman grabbing him before he got electrocuted lol…. Sadly he passed away last year.

Cheers Graham.



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Nanny state ? Left at the gate !! :)
   
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Posts: 35
Grum:

That's quite a nice little circuit.
Since that's obviously a single wire effect, you might try placing a T shaped electrode next to the spark gap.  If the spark gap goes out, and you get two sparks towards the ends of the T arms, that will prove that potential is traveling on both sides of the tangled wire 'polar mass' - out and back.
This is a very important function to recognize.
   
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Posts: 45
Jerry,

referring to you scheme in your post # 20, what do you mean by

Quote
Normally open connection

"Normally" related to which application ?

Edit: @jerry, @Grumage, I have added a few circuit-diagrams you may try.  In a russian forum long time ago I saw a picture of
         a metal cup as capcitative load on top. Inside the cup the guy had placed a door-nob-capacitor 500pf >
         10 kV so that one terminal was laying ( galvanic connection)  on the bottom of the cup. The other terminal was
         connected to a incandescent lamp and from the lamp he had a wire connected to a winding of the primary.
         There were only 5 primary thick copper-windings so it seemed to me he was just gliding with the end of the wire
         along the primary until he found the right spot. The bulb was fully lit.
         The door-nop capacitor in this setup was acting as a high frequency-resistance so he will get enough voltage-drop for the
         230 V  lamp...lampitschka  ;D
         That is the reason why I propose the feedback to the primary of the HV-transformer as a option.

         One additional remark: Keep the feedback-line of the T-Tap as short as possible otherwise you get some uncontrolled
         inductive element in the circuit which influences the switching-speed of the sparkgap negatively.
         See: ADA638250.pdf

Its not my style to only suggest circuits and not showing my own work but I am in the midst of another subject and have no extra time right now to test this myself

Mike
« Last Edit: 2021-10-19, 22:09:36 by Kator01 »
   
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Posts: 35
Normally open connection means there usually isn't a wire from that spot directly to the gap.

Dragging the wire until you find a 'relative' hot spot along the primary is a good system.  The hot spots will be closer together with a higher frequency circuit operation.

Thanks for the other good information you also posted.
   
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Posts: 45
Jerry,

you're welcome.
Please have a look at my drawing if you find some flaw. The reason : most of us have a flyback at hand with integrated diodes, easy to control with pwm-drivers, so your circuit in the lower left would not be possible.
Especially the middle-circuit I am not certain if this will work.

Did you ever used of of the other circuits using a flyback with integrated diodes ? Any experience with this ?

Mike
   
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Posts: 35
I haven't had time to build a related semiconductor circuit, but I do have the components.

Those flybacks with internal diodes won't produce the T-tap static unless you add another rectifier from the output to the spark gap, then T-tap the floating wire to the input of that diode.  But there has to be a diode after the capacitor.
However you can still pull an inductive tap without the extra diode, using your single wire circuit.

And your third circuit looks interesting.
   
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Posts: 45
Hello Jerry,

I was just using the top-left design you posted.
So with this circuit we can use flaybacks with integrated diodes and if that does not work I have to build it up with a
pure HV transformer.


Mike
   
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Posts: 35
It would be pretty hard to get a jumper wire across diodes moulded into the flybacks.  I posted those circuits to show there's various ways to bridge a circuit, but only ONE way works.  You have to have a capacitor followed by a diode.  Otherwise, what you get won't be static.
   
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Posts: 45
Jerry,

I was mistaken, I meant the two configurations on the on the right side, these would work for a flyback with integrated diodes.

Another question: how did you construct your capacitors ? Value ? <= 1 Mycofarad ?

Mike
   
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Posts: 35
Here's a message I posted about capacitor construction.  A basic capacitor would have two sheets of foil and enough polypropylene sheets to withstand the potential.  I've made caps like this with 5 nf at 7.5 kV.

I've developed a tricky capacitor that some members might find interesting.  This is a key component of my Shape Resonance 'open connection' circuit.

It's common practice for me to make my hV caps out of sheet protectors and sheets of foil.  I like to stack three packs of dielectric, a piece of foil, then three more sheet protectors, etc.

Most of my caps have two layers of foil, with a value in the low nano Farads.  This particular component has twice as many layers.  These layers are stacked with connecting tabs coming out on alternating sides.  (Ultimately, two tabs on each side). The tabs should be a couple of inches wide, for low impeadance, and to prevent sheet-to-sheet shorting.  (Where two pieces of foil touch on the same side).

Once the stack is completed, with strips of shippping tape holding everything in place, I attach some 'hairpin' connecting electrodes.  These start as a couple pieces of wire with tight bends near one end.  These hairpin electrodes are then slipped over the stacked foil tabs, and crimped down.  The short end of a J electrode should come almost clear across the top tab, with the other end of the electrode wire extending far enough beyond the edge of the cap to facilitate connection.

The thing which makes this capacitor so tricky is that the connecting electrode wires have an inductive bend, and this causes the two sets of sheets to charge and discharge out of phase, producing a biphasic output into just one of the electrodes.
   
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