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Author Topic: Tesla Switch project  (Read 92 times)

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This thread is to replace some of the information that was lost when Ken left the forum and deleted everything (in the Motor controller/Bidini-Brandt thread).  I haven't got the time to build and test this at the moment but I will as soon as possible.

Just to refresh, I explained the operation of this Tesla switch circuit as:

A circuit that uses 4 batteries and connects 2 of them in series and the other 2 in parellel, the two in parrelel are charged by the two in series. In this process there is an extra 12 volts that is dropped through the load.  When it switches just the reverse occurs with the batteries and the drop through the load changes direction.  Being the energy is passed back and forth through the load discharging and recharging the batteries the the dipole is not killed and yet we have power at the load.  Introducing a reactive element into it as a load i.e. a transformer could provide some very interesting results. This is not an easy circuit to deal with though, even if it does look easy, the biggest problem is there is no common Ground reference.  That is why all the pulse transformers to drive the switching transistors.  I think it will function the best at higher frequencies such as 50 to 1000 Hz.  An obvious spot to try it would be 50 or 60 Hz with a transformer - 12 to 120 volts.  At any rate here are some of the circuits I designed for this.


 
« Last Edit: 2011-06-05, 19:46:39 by Room3327 »


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"Whatever our resources of primary energy may be in the future, we must, to be rational, obtain it without consumption of any material"  Nicola Tesla

"When bad men combine, the good must associate; else they will fall one by one, an unpitied sacrifice in a contemptible struggle."  Edmund Burke
   

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I also believe this circuit functions with all four batteries fully charged, as the circuit shuffels the energy around it all the batteries will come to a balanced state regardless of the starting charge in them.  A dead one will only lower the charge in the other 3 to balance the charge's out.  So I recommend starting with all fully charged batteries. I think just draining a small amount of charge and then recharging at say a 60 Hz rate could keep the load running for a very long time compared to batteries having the dipole killed to operate the same load.  Obviously charging and discharging rapidly will hurt and maybe destroy some battery types such as nicad's,  this should function best with lead acid batteries or gell cells that can be repeatedly charged and discharged.

Trying it with fully charged capacitors may be fun?  Batteries may not take the charge quickly enough?  There are alot of variables here that I thought Ken was going to run down but I guess not now?
« Last Edit: 2010-06-30, 23:51:42 by Room3327 »


---------------------------
"Whatever our resources of primary energy may be in the future, we must, to be rational, obtain it without consumption of any material"  Nicola Tesla

"When bad men combine, the good must associate; else they will fall one by one, an unpitied sacrifice in a contemptible struggle."  Edmund Burke
   

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Posts: 444
Ken did build this basic circuit, the ######/Brandt, with a relay and got some interesting results after putting a transformer in the output.  But like I tried to tell him relays are slow, noisey and prone to breakdown when operated continously.  It failed after a short time, I do not recommend using relays in this circuit at all.  He did show though, that the battery voltages did level out after awhile, but voltage readings do not mean much and we should have been looking at total charge in the batteries. Voltage readings do not correlate to power, I can produce any voltage you want but it does not mean that I have a lot of energy there. Once again power input needs to be measured against power output to really tell us anything.
« Last Edit: 2010-07-01, 18:22:48 by Room3327 »


---------------------------
"Whatever our resources of primary energy may be in the future, we must, to be rational, obtain it without consumption of any material"  Nicola Tesla

"When bad men combine, the good must associate; else they will fall one by one, an unpitied sacrifice in a contemptible struggle."  Edmund Burke
   

Group: Moderator
Sr. Member
*****

Posts: 444
The simplest test I can think of for this circuit is to pick a specific load for it and measure the running time of the load on one battery down to a specified dead point. Then run the Tesla circuit with the same load on it and again run down all 4 batteries to the same specified dead point.  If the Tesla circuit can run the load for more then 4X times the single battery test then it is providing more energy from the same batteries then you could get without the circuit.  This will show if not killing the dipole really works to provide more energy or not.


---------------------------
"Whatever our resources of primary energy may be in the future, we must, to be rational, obtain it without consumption of any material"  Nicola Tesla

"When bad men combine, the good must associate; else they will fall one by one, an unpitied sacrifice in a contemptible struggle."  Edmund Burke
   
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