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Author Topic: Doubochinski cooling system  (Read 189 times)
Sr. Member
****

Posts: 488
Hi All,

I am studying all of Doubochinski's publications, full of new ideas.
I'm actually looking for what's applicable to electronics, but I came across another subject that can be very interesting. I don't have time now to dwell on it, but I would like to point it out.

This is a simple but very effective cooling principle that Doubochinski and his company Quantix have experimented with.

The principle is simple. The evaporation of water absorbs heat by taking it from the surrounding environment. The evaporation is proportional to the ratio of the surface area of water in contact with the air, relative to its volume. By spraying the water in very fine droplets, the water surface can be multiplied by hundreds of times, and the water evaporates almost instantly.

A few quotes:
"Our poor student, stupefied by classroom drilling in entropy and the "Carnot cycle", has completely overlooked the possibility, that a system might cool itself down entirely by its own resources - by an internal phase change, with little or no external work required!"
"A paradoxical consequence of this approach is that the new method of cooling becomes more and more efficient, as the temperature of the water increases"
"Assuming a rate of evaporation of 1g of water per second, the resulting rate of heat removal would be 540 calories per second, which corresponds roughly to the cooling power of an average home air conditioner. But to obtain a comparable rate of heat removal by the compression/expansion method, a standard air conditioner needs over 500 watts of electric power."


The process is known, but Doubochinski's art is to succeed in atomizing water into really fine droplets, and with very little energy:

"We fill the jar with boiling hot water, screw on the cap, and turn on the air pump. Immediately the reactor emits a fine spray of water mist, forming a cloud which quickly disappears into the surrounding air.  We place our hand in front of the nozzle. Amazing!  Although the water in the jar remains at near boiling temperature, the spray coming out is cold to the touch!
The combination of the atomizing process itself and the subsequent evaporation of a portion of the droplets ejected from the device, has caused a drastic drop in temperature. Within a tiny fraction of a second, the temperature of the water goes from 96 degrees centigrade inside the jar, to below 15 degrees at a certain distance from the spray nozzle.
Even the best atomizers, based on heretofore known principles, do not come near such an intense cooling effect.  Moreover, the power consumption of the small air pump - which constitutes the entire external power input of the new device - is only a tiny fraction of the power required by standard atomization systems transforming comparable volumes of water into submicron-sized droplets."


So could we use this temperature difference of 80 C to generate electricity by a conventional thermogenerator, which would supply the device in a loop, I ask you...

The Doubochinski system has been certified by two independent certification bodies.
"The measurements showed that the specific power requirement of the new device is 10 or more times less than that of conventional refrigeration technology"

The rest here (pdf), with explanations from Doubochinski and Tennenbaum of the reasons for the effectiveness thanks to the principle drawn from the argumental pendulum.


---------------------------
"Chance favours only the prepared mind."  Louis Pasteur
   

Hero Member
*****

Posts: 3280


Buy me some coffee
Hi All,

I am studying all of Doubochinski's publications, full of new ideas.
I'm actually looking for what's applicable to electronics, but I came across another subject that can be very interesting. I don't have time now to dwell on it, but I would like to point it out.

This is a simple but very effective cooling principle that Doubochinski and his company Quantix have experimented with.

The principle is simple. The evaporation of water absorbs heat by taking it from the surrounding environment. The evaporation is proportional to the ratio of the surface area of water in contact with the air, relative to its volume. By spraying the water in very fine droplets, the water surface can be multiplied by hundreds of times, and the water evaporates almost instantly.

A few quotes:
"Our poor student, stupefied by classroom drilling in entropy and the "Carnot cycle", has completely overlooked the possibility, that a system might cool itself down entirely by its own resources - by an internal phase change, with little or no external work required!"
"A paradoxical consequence of this approach is that the new method of cooling becomes more and more efficient, as the temperature of the water increases"
"Assuming a rate of evaporation of 1g of water per second, the resulting rate of heat removal would be 540 calories per second, which corresponds roughly to the cooling power of an average home air conditioner. But to obtain a comparable rate of heat removal by the compression/expansion method, a standard air conditioner needs over 500 watts of electric power."


The process is known, but Doubochinski's art is to succeed in atomizing water into really fine droplets, and with very little energy:

"We fill the jar with boiling hot water, screw on the cap, and turn on the air pump. Immediately the reactor emits a fine spray of water mist, forming a cloud which quickly disappears into the surrounding air.  We place our hand in front of the nozzle. Amazing!  Although the water in the jar remains at near boiling temperature, the spray coming out is cold to the touch!
The combination of the atomizing process itself and the subsequent evaporation of a portion of the droplets ejected from the device, has caused a drastic drop in temperature. Within a tiny fraction of a second, the temperature of the water goes from 96 degrees centigrade inside the jar, to below 15 degrees at a certain distance from the spray nozzle.
Even the best atomizers, based on heretofore known principles, do not come near such an intense cooling effect.  [b]Moreover, the power consumption of the small air pump - which constitutes the entire external power input of the new device - is only a tiny fraction of the power required by standard atomization systems[/b] transforming comparable volumes of water into submicron-sized droplets."


So could we use this temperature difference of 80 C to generate electricity by a conventional thermogenerator, which would supply the device in a loop, I ask you...

The Doubochinski system has been certified by two independent certification bodies.
"The measurements showed that the specific power requirement of the new device is 10 or more times less than that of conventional refrigeration technology"

The rest here (pdf), with explanations from Doubochinski and Tennenbaum of the reasons for the effectiveness thanks to the principle drawn from the argumental pendulum.

So what energy heats the water to boiling point?.

I think a giant drinking bird setup would be far better-no boiling water needed.


Brad


---------------------------
Never let your schooling get in the way of your education.
   
Sr. Member
****

Posts: 488
So what energy heats the water to boiling point?.
...
Good point  :).

We must take into account that the system is designed to cool, so heat is what we have "free" and what we don't need. I suppose that if we used another liquid, we could cool it to a temperature of 80 ° C below the ambient temperature, which is unhexhaustible because provided by the environment.


---------------------------
"Chance favours only the prepared mind."  Louis Pasteur
   

Hero Member
*****

Posts: 3280


Buy me some coffee
Good point  :).

We must take into account that the system is designed to cool, so heat is what we have "free" and what we don't need. I suppose that if we used another liquid, we could cool it to a temperature of 80 ° C below the ambient temperature, which is unhexhaustible because provided by the environment.

I will post this video here,as we are talking about dissipating heat with water vapour.
This would be the best-in depth description i have found on the drinking bird heat engine.
So simple,and could be scaled to do a lot of work.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UCKC-QVcVn0


Brad


---------------------------
Never let your schooling get in the way of your education.
   
Sr. Member
****

Posts: 488
...
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UCKC-QVcVn0
Very clear explanation of a smart idea, thanks Brad!

And interesting to know that methylene chloride boils at 39.6° C, it could be useful for the future.
I don't think we could use it in the context, because in the Doubochinski system, the liquid must not return from the vapor, otherwise we would lose all the energy gain obtained by vaporization. It must dissipate in air, so to avoid risks, we can use only a breathable gas like water vapor.



---------------------------
"Chance favours only the prepared mind."  Louis Pasteur
   
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