PopularFX
Home Help Search Login Register
Welcome,Guest. Please login or register.
2019-10-20, 22:24:01
News: A feature is available which provides a place all members can chat, either publicly or privately.
There is also a "Shout" feature on each page. Only available to members.

Pages: [1]
Author Topic: Graham Gunderson open sourcing magnetic implosion transformer  (Read 342 times)
Group: Ambassador
Hero Member
*****

Posts: 3230

Graham Gunderson open sourcing magnetic implosion transformer
« on: Today at 08:09:54 PM »

    Quote
   

Thanks to a new friend Jim D for sharing today  .

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aqxFC70wyM0
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WvSBVu3c_BE

more info to follow
much gratitude to Graham

Chet K
   
Group: Professor
Hero Member
*****

Posts: 2590
  Has Jim D looked at or reviewed this device?
Thanks for posting!
Steve
   

Group: Elite Experimentalist
Hero Member
*****

Posts: 1834

I completly second that what user Void has been posting here:
https://overunity.com/18346/graham-gunderson-open-sourcing-magnetic-implosion-transformer/msg539644/#msg539644

The video´s are impressive, especially the amount of measuring devices and the building quality of the
device itself, but it is impossible to get i good view / notion on what is presented / claimed.

Very interesting none the less, but hopefully indeed "more info to follow".

Thanks for posting,   itsu
   
Group: Professor
Hero Member
*****

Posts: 2590
    At the end, Graham admits there are various inputs - not just one.  He makes an effort to estimate the TOTAL (summed) input power from the various inputs, OK - but has he evaluated ALL the input power?
    Also, it seems so very complex with all the mosfets and coils.  Is a simpler version possible?  One that could be replicated more readily would be great.
   
Group: Ambassador
Hero Member
*****

Posts: 3230
We shall see ?

Replication is after all the goal of open source
And truly the best venue for success and improvement!

Getting away from the wall outlet too...
   
Group: Elite
Hero Member
******

Posts: 3635
It's turtles all the way down
At the very beginning he points to the supply input at 295 volts 80 mA that's 23.6 Watts in DC. Now this is in disagreement with the Clark Hess negligible measurement of input power.

Output power is 9.5 Watts which looks right

A very well done professional presentation, Graham speaks the lingo and knows of what he speaks, but what about that DC input power? Am I missing something?

Nevertheless there are some interesting things going on in that presentation.


---------------------------
"Secrecy, secret societies and secret groups have always been repugnant to a free and open society"......John F Kennedy
   
Group: Professor
Hero Member
*****

Posts: 1258
Graham demonstrated this transformer at the 2016 Energy Conference and it resulted in much discussion here on OUR at
https://www.overunityresearch.com/index.php?topic=3319.msg56121#msg56121.  23 pages of it!
Smudge
   
Group: Professor
Hero Member
*****

Posts: 1258
I posted various papers in that other thread putting forward various possibilities for how it worked.  I used images taken at that Energy Conference and posted by Reiyuki.  My final conclusion I put in a paper and I see I promised to post this in reply #556 of that thread.  Obviously I didn't do that and the thread came to an abrupt halt.  Don't know why I didn't post it, maybe I had second thoughts about the title "The Gunderson Smith Effect".  Anyway the claim is that ferrite can exhibit a ferromagnetic resonance resulting in the mu peaking at a high frequency slightly below that resonant frequency, and that can be exploited to get OU, more so in the non-linear region where the core is biased by magnets to be near the saturation knee. 

Here is that paper which promises a new thread, but that of course didn't happen.  Maybe this could be that new thread.

Smudge
   
Group: Experimentalist
Hero Member
*****

Posts: 917
At the very beginning he points to the supply input at 295 volts 80 mA that's 23.6 Watts in DC. Now this is in disagreement with the Clark Hess negligible measurement of input power.

Output power is 9.5 Watts which looks right

A very well done professional presentation, Graham speaks the lingo and knows of what he speaks, but what about that DC input power? Am I missing something?

Nevertheless there are some interesting things going on in that presentation.

Ion,

Your observation of the power supplied by the 295v dc supply of 23.6 watts is quite important and if analyzed correctly, provides a somewhat different view of the device.  Graham's MIT is basically a reactive-to-real converter which means there are AC input voltage and current waveforms consuming VARS of power and producing a DC output thru some transforming means. 

In the MIT, the 295v DC supply feeds the current limit inductor connected to the top of the "H" bridge.  The "H" bridge with it's switches and timing produces the AC input voltage and current waveforms that are connected to the primary of the MIT.  It is at this point in the circuitry (the primary) that Graham's input measurements are taken as he states in the video, with the resulting high reactive var of 2.244*419 = 940.2 compared to the real input of ~.5 watts.

Herein lies a potential problem not even considering the difficulty in accurately measuring an input with a reactive/real ratio of 940.2/.5 = 1880:1.  The problem is, one must be able to synthesize the input voltage waveform that will produce the same current waveform in the test device or, we are deluding ourselves with the measurements.  This may be difficult to understand for those who have not built and tested reactive-to-real
converters, but in my experience with my own Magneto Electric Induction devices, I could demonstrate and have others replicate infinite OU that was really not OU at all.  When measuring the reactive input waveforms as Graham is doing, OU is present even though as one can see, the DC power feeding the input circuitry is far greater.  The DC input power measurement is accurate regardless of the measurements taken at the reactive AC input voltage and current points and I would even say the circuit design itself. 

This is of course my opinion and I realize it will be rather unpopular at this point but the proof will lie in the attempt to loop the MIT or by building the device with synthesized input waveforms.  The frequency of ~38kHz is low enough to synthesize with current technology and I do believe Graham could do this.  I do not wish to be negative, but I believe both attempts will fail!

Regards,
Pm

   
   
Group: Professor
Hero Member
*****

Posts: 2590
  Here is another, longer vid by Graham (introduced by Aaron M) on the same subject:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=o5E71QwCdAY&t
   
Pages: [1]
« previous next »


 

Home Help Search Login Register
Theme © PopularFX | Based on PFX Ideas! | Scripts from iScript4u 2019-10-20, 22:24:01