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Author Topic: Is Larmor involved in Meyer's 42.8 Khz  (Read 1031 times)
Jr. Member
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I am just trying to join the dots.

You may want to see the image on this page:

https://mriquestions.com/who-was-larmor.html

Larmor's Hydrogen frequency is stated as 42.58 MHz.

42.8 Khz aparently used by Meyer and others.

0.1 th harmonic seems very close. And Meyer said no magnetic field in the cell.

Any thoughts on this?
   

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https://mriquestions.com/who-was-larmor.html
Larmor's Hydrogen frequency is stated as 42.58 MHz.
No, it is stated as 42.58 MHz/Tesla.

In your question you seem to assume that the Larmor precession frequency it constant* for an isotope.
It is not - it depends on the magnetic flux density (B) that the nucleus is subjected to.
For example at 2T the hydrogen's nucleus will precess with the frequency of 85.16MHz ...and at 0T - 0Hz.

Because of this dependency your question about a particular frequency of a particular isotope is ambiguous, as it is missing the critical parameter (B).

The good news is that the gyromagnetic ratio is constant for an isotope barring chemical shifts.

*because you are citing particular frequencies with units of frequency such as MHz and kHz.
   

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42.8 Khz apparently used by Meyer and others.
0.1 th harmonic seems very close.
42.8kHz is closer to the ~1000th (995th) subharmonic of the 42.58MHz than to the 10th subharmonic.

And Meyer said no magnetic field in the cell.
Stanley Meyer did not mention it*.
Michael Meyer mentioned it a lot.

*...but it does not mean that an inadvertent magnetic field was not present in his device.
   
Jr. Member
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Posts: 72
I recall Stan Meyer in a video mentioned something about avoiding magnetism near the cell.
Putting my suspicious hat on, why would he mention it at all.

Given we are talking about 1000th of the Larmor constant for 1T then a 1mT magnet at the cell might actually
have some effect!
   

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I recall Stan Meyer in a video mentioned something about avoiding magnetism near the cell.
Putting my suspicious hat on, why would he mention it at all.
Perhaps you could ask someone who is a better psychologist than I am.

Given we are talking about 1000th of the Larmor constant for 1T then a 1mT magnet at the cell might actually have some effect!
The Earth's magnetic flux density at the surface is from 0.025mT to 0.065mT but the ferromagnetic parts of the device can become inadvertently magnetized to higher levels.
   
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Larmor's Hydrogen frequency is stated as 42.58 MHz.

42.8 Khz aparently used by Meyer and others.


I think this goes back to the work of John Worrell Keely who I reckon was doing work dissociatating water acoustically. It is interesting to note that HF speakers now exist with a frequency response extending out to this point, albeit somewhat attenuated.
   

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It is interesting to note that HF speakers now exist with a frequency response extending out to this point, albeit somewhat attenuated.
Ultrasonic transducers can easily reach higher frequencies, e.g.:
See this 120kHz transducer.
Serr this 1.7MHz transducer.
   

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Buy me a cigar
I remember a video conference where the presenter talked about blowing a neat hole through his roof. This was using ultrasonic transducer technology.

Anyone else remember it ?


---------------------------
Nanny state ? Left at the gate !! :)
   
Jr. Member
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I remember a video conference where the presenter talked about blowing a neat hole through his roof. This was using ultrasonic transducer technology.

Anyone else remember it ?

I believe this story was spread by one of Bob Boyce's groopies. Never thought it was serious. Something about a motor with a burnt out phase coming in to contact with water.
   
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I heard a man in his shop scanning frequency in water  for wine/ vineyard ( purity / impurities) research?

He was working in a cylinder with transponder frequency sweeping and sudden burst out through top
and round hole in roof
   

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Buy me a cigar
I believe this story was spread by one of Bob Boyce's groopies. Never thought it was serious. Something about a motor with a burnt out phase coming in to contact with water.

No, not at all. Chet’s description is pretty close to the mark. I have the information somewhere, I’ll try to find it.

Cheers Grum.


---------------------------
Nanny state ? Left at the gate !! :)
   
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Ultrasonic transducers can easily reach higher frequencies, e.g.:
See this 120kHz transducer.
Serr this 1.7MHz transducer.

If they be tuned accurately to the region between 42.75 and 42.85khz then it should be possible to reproduce Keely's water fracturing work.
   

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If they be tuned accurately to the region between 42.75 and 42.85khz then it should be possible to reproduce Keely's water fracturing work.
Before purchasing, it would be prudent to verify whether these transducers can operate below their narrow mechanical resonance frequency.
In other words: Whether they are narrow-band or wide-band transducers.

Also, driving piezo transducers accurately with a single tone sweep requires an analog High Voltage amplifier.  This is expensive to buy and is not easy to build but a good schematic is in Horowitz's "Art of Electronics" book.
   
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