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2024-05-23, 07:03:03
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Author Topic: Using natural (thermally driven) remanence decay to deliver overunity energy  (Read 2610 times)

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Doesn't the first video contradict the above?
And the second video confirm?
No because the core in the first video is not completely soft and the one in the second video - is.

I always thought that the difference between soft and hard ferromagnetic materials was the degree and speed of decay of remanent magnetization.  In other words: a soft material loses its magnetization very quickly or instantaneously, while a hard one - very slowly or not at all.
Smudge suggests that it is not a matter of speed but a different phenomenon entirely.

I've seen accounts of experimenters who charge a homemade PMH and hang on their garage wall for years, then recording the separation of the keeper bar. Little if any remanent decay was noticed, although it wasn't accurately measured.
I haven't witnessed a perceptible decay of remanence either.
Smudge writes that the remanent magnetization decays slowly over years but my childhood recordings on magnetic tapes are still playable.

None of it means that a material cannot be engineered which exhibits a faster decay of remanent magnetization.
   

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Attached are two files describing the iron carburizing processes.
   

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Attached are two files describing the iron carburizing processes.
Usually the process is followed by rapid quenching and that is where the SEMP process differs.  It seems they have discovered that transformer Fe can have its remanent magnetism retention time reduced from many years down to milliseconds simply by not performing rapid quenching, but instead let the object cool slowly over 10 hours or more while remaining in a high carbon environment.  Surely that is something that should be verified.

Smudge
   

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I always thought that the difference between soft and hard ferromagnetic materials was the degree and speed of decay of remanent magnetization.  In other words: a soft material loses its magnetization very quickly or instantaneously, while a hard one - very slowly or not at all.
Smudge suggests that it is not a matter of speed but a different phenomenon entirely.
I always thought that a perfect soft material can only inherit its magnetization by the application of an external influence, there is no remanence to be considered.  Only hard material has remanence.  But of course all soft materials do have some (hopefully small) remanence that causes the BH loop to have area and creates losses.  It is generally assumed that the losses appear as heat in the material.  The question on how long this (small) remanence would survive if it was allowed to remain is not germain to how well a transformer works as it is assumed to be permanent magnetism.  In use it does not remain permanently as it gets swepped away and its presence is already accounted for by that BH loop area. Only recently have I discovered that materials can have remanence with decay times ranging from from many years (tens, hundreds, thousands?) down to milliseconds or less.   
Quote
I haven't witnessed a perceptible decay of remanence either.
Smudge writes that the remanent magnetization decays slowly over years but my childhood recordings on magnetic tapes are still playable.
Will that still be true in another 100 years?  Are the sound volumes the same as when they were recorded?

Smudge
   

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Here are some more thoughts and formula on this subject.  Every way I look at this the system yields OU.

Smudge
   

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Will that still be true in another 100 years?  Are the sound volumes the same as when they were recorded?
IDK x2.
   

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Here is some analogy getting electricity energy from heat of an environment without a temperature gradient. :)
   

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Here is some analogy getting electricity energy from heat of an environment without a temperature gradient. :)
Zaev's next paper that appears at the end of this one is more relevant as it uses the difference between magnetization energy and demagnetization energy.

Here is a photo copy.

Smudge
   
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Here is another interesting paper from Zaev.  His material seems to be difficult to find!

Regards,
Pm

   

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Here is another interesting paper from Zaev.  His material seems to be difficult to find!

Regards,
Pm
Looking back at the large number of scientific documents I have amassed in my computer I see I already downloaded these Zaev papers in 2007!  He touches on many aspects that I am exploring now.  I think his approach (that is using magnetically soft material, so differs from my "hard" material that is not quite "hard") uses very narrow input pulses that start the magnetizing process while initial permeability is very low, but having started that process the magnetization continues to build up after the end of the pulse (that he ascribes to magnetic viscosity or magnetic accomodation).  That creates greater energy magnetically that is recovered in the demagnetization cycle.  Note his use of the initial permeability ui and maximum permeability umax and their ratio to determine the ratio between magnetization energy and demagnetization energy.  The significant feature is umax/ui should be high, as indeed it is in many ferrites.  I have come across an early paper (1954) looking at conditions for square hysteresis loops in ferrites that gives ui for some ferroxcubes and other materials.

Smudge
   
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Smudge,

In your Zaev documents, would you happen to have "Genesis of Inductance Energy"?  He supposedly talks more about the initial fast high energy pulse to create a 'spontaneous magnetization' or 'avalanche-like' chain reaction in the vacuum.

Pm
   

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As far as I understand, the second law of thermodynamics does not prevent the conversion of thermal energy without a temperature gradient into other energy.  Or am I wrong ?
   
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