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Author Topic: Simple Electrical Conversion Circuit  (Read 1558 times)
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Gabriel Kron was a brilliant electrical pioneer.  As an engineer, he was regarded at the top of the group which was American born.  If we include Tesla, then Dr. Kron would be second on the list.  Unfortunately, he had an employer who sewed up all of his 'alternative' discoveries, into secrecy.

Gabriel Kron was also a Free Energy researcher.  He did claim results, but said the only clue he could provide is that there are points in every circuit between which exists an open connection.

It turns out that I've been researching a circuit like that on my own, which I'll describe in my next post, then present a more advanced version.
   
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Hello Jerry,

welcome to this forum.

I was digging a bit and found this website which lists almost all of his publication at the end, remarkable indeed, looking forward to what you will present

http://quantum-chemistry-history.com/Kron_Dat/KronGabriel1.htm

Who was this employer ?

Mike
   
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Thanks for the correct biographical information - I got mine from Bearden, iirc.  That site also mentioned he worked at GE.  As it is, your post is a good, solid addition to this area of the forum's data files.

This circuit I'm working with, in its simplest form, is just a hv transformer with a diode, cap, and a spark gap.  There are a variety of ways to wire up the four components, then test a jumper wire clipped between two components, to see if you can pull an additional spark at a different part of the circuit.  And this needs to happen without the spark gap going out.

For the conversion effect, the capacitor needs to come before the diode leading to the spark gap with the transformer's return wire.  The open connection is between the cap/diode junction and the center off the spark gap's arc.  (Off to the side).  The end of the jumper wire forms a third point with the spark gap, producing a second spark aimed perpendicular to the main arc.  This spark contains a different kind of energy, with unusual characteristics.
   
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Here are some example circuits, showing usable open connections.  Each of these circuits can be augmented by closing the open connections with an extra spark gap.  (No mater how small).  This will produce effects not normally available at the main gap.  The circuit I'm using is the third one, on the bottom left.  This circuit converts the transformer's inductive energy into some kind of vibrating static electricity.  This kind of energy is not a thousand years ahead of us.  It wouldn't take anywhere near that amount of time to develop related levels of technology, once the energy is known about.
   
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Here's an example of what this kind of energy looks like.  I've got two concentric grids, separated by Teflon.  The end of the jumper wire from the T tap connection is touching the outer grid.  There's a pale bluish/purple spark jumping from the jumper wire's contact point down to the inner grid, then on to the central electrode.   This spark is thin, pale, and hard to see, and that's becouse of the background lighting level.  In the sun shine, the same spark would be bright, deep purple, and thick and feathery, with the feather lines consisting of miniscule spheres streaming along.  So, when the spark interacts with light having the right spectrum, it forms quadric plasmons.

The second picture is even better because it shows the effect of placing a voltage gradient on a piece of charcoal.  A second, higher intensity discharge is pulled through the carbon - by the gradient - to the spark gap leading to the transformer's return wire.  This gradient is caused by charge coupling with the ends of the two grids, with differing potentials.  (How about using wire rings to couple the charge gradient to the carbon?  Driven by voltage multipliers?)

Looking at the bench layout, I do remember that I turned the diode tube around before these pictures.  That vacuum tube is a 1Q3 hv rectifier.  Similar to the common 1B3 valve, this one has a complete grid which spirals up to the top of the filament.  So, at a certain voltage and frequency, it can be used as a Farnsworth Tube.
   
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Jerry
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This circuit converts the transformer's inductive energy into some kind of vibrating static electricity.  This kind of energy is not a thousand years ahead of us.  It wouldn't take anywhere near that amount of time to develop related levels of technology, once the energy is known about.

I would agree and I can confirm the effects your talking about.

Most free energy inventors of the past also claimed to have seen these kinds of effects. My working theory is that matter is made of particles and fields already in motion. As such if an external force could couple to these internal motions then they could be manipulated. In effect were talking about modifying one property matter which ultimately effects other properties.

For example, we can take groups of observable particles like sand grains, Styrofoam balls etc. add HV fields and the particles can be attracted/repelled or levitated. So we know this effect works on the macro level and the next obvious step would be to try to apply it on the micro level.

I equate the basic effect with the Franklin Bell experiment. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Franklin_bells
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_E5gP7zdXgY

Regards
AC






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Comprehend and Copy Nature... Viktor Schauberger

“Progress is impossible without change, and those who cannot change their minds cannot change anything.” George Bernard Shaw
   
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Besides that, the energy produced by the circuit also has applications which don't require additional, external interaction.  For instance, it can be used for shape resonance.  A small, tapered alligator clip clipped to a transformer wire, with the clip's wire momentarily closing the open connection so that, after a few seconds, a heavy yellow spark shoots from the side of the alligator clip down to the wire it's clipped to.  A tiny, momentary, purple spark produces a heavy yellow static discharge.  I'll post that circuit a little later.  Maybe a video showing the time delay.

And with the charge pump effect picture, I just drilled the charcoal so it would slide onto the 1/8" ss electrode rod.  This rod has no connection, although it could.  There is no spark between the rods, without the 'pumped' spark at the top.  What WOULD Kirchoff say?  And is this a road to ou?
   

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Hey Jerry

In the bottom left circuit you say you are using,  when you power the transformer (AC), does the spark gap continuously spark? If the diode tube does not allow a reverse current, it would seem the spark would happen and then cease to continue once the cap gets fully charged, and the only way the cap would charge is if there was a spark.  Your arrows of connection points, the one that points toward the spark gap, which side of the spark gap is it connected to?  If it is the diode side, then you are allowing a path across the diode, allowing a path reverse of the diode. Once the cap is charged and spark ceases to occur, when the transformer sec changes phase at some point, the cap voltage would add with the transformer output and provide a higher voltage across the gap than the transformer would produce by itself. That is if the arrow is pointing at the connection of the spark gap which connects to the diode. So yeah, there would be a different output across your connections than seen across the spark gap when it charged the cap. Near or on point of twice the voltage than the transformer output itself. So Id have to say that the effect of your output to your connections would definitely be different than the circuit would show on its own.

Yeah, would need to see your circuit and a clearer idea and imaging of what your are experiencing.

Thanks for showing

Mags

   
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I'd like to take a minute right here, to share some very important cautionary information.  (Then I'll quote the preceding message).

The circuit with the T-tap going to the center of the arc produces NON-GROUNDING ENERGY.  Once the bicolor purple spark appears, vibrating static spreads out onto the entire circuit, its input/output wires, and any associated ground rod.  The NON-GROUNDING energy doesn't disappear at any of these points, but will spread underground throughout the entire neighborhood, in the form of 'stray voltage'.  The NON-GROUNDING stray voltage static impulses from your ground rod will also float on underground water.  This will electrify the water coming out of someone else's faucet or shower.  Even the landscape sprinkler water.  And operating the grounded circuit inside will also electrify a metal water pipe out in the yard.  (For power transmission).

The thing everyone has to keep in mind is DO NOT BUILD THIS CIRCUIT AND THEN JUST PLUG IT IN.  If you want to do it, it MUST be powered by a non grounded battery driven inverter.  And if you touch any metal on the battery, the wires, or the inverter, you'll not only feel a shock, but you'll also kill the inverter.  And the same goes for any electronics in your genset, if you go that route.

So be careful, expand your safety zone focus.  Don't shock someone's Pace Maker.
   
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Jerry
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The circuit with the T-tap going to the center of the arc produces NON-GROUNDING ENERGY.  Once the bicolor purple spark appears, vibrating static spreads out onto the entire circuit, its input/output wires, and any associated ground rod.  The NON-GROUNDING energy doesn't disappear at any of these points, but will spread underground throughout the entire neighborhood, in the form of 'stray voltage'.  The NON-GROUNDING stray voltage static impulses from your ground rod will also float on underground water.  This will electrify the water coming out of someone else's faucet or shower.  Even the landscape sprinkler water.  And operating the grounded circuit inside will also electrify a metal water pipe out in the yard.  (For power transmission).

I would agree and my (DC) Van De Graaff generator has a completely different nature than my (AC) Tesla coil.

Generally speaking a HV AC source charges something (+) for a period then cancels said (+) charge with a (-) charge cycle. Where a HV DC source can keep adding (+) or (-) charges which disperse outward to objects and the environment. There are also instances where HV generators only output one polarity. That is the charging effect was not equal and opposite and these devices were considered uni-polar generators.

So there's a lot going on we still don't fully understand...

Regards
AC


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Comprehend and Copy Nature... Viktor Schauberger

“Progress is impossible without change, and those who cannot change their minds cannot change anything.” George Bernard Shaw
   
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Hey Jerry

In the bottom left circuit you say you are using,  when you power the transformer (AC), does the spark gap continuously spark? If the diode tube does not allow a reverse current, it would seem the spark would happen and then cease to continue once the cap gets fully charged, and the only way the cap would charge is if there was a spark.  Your arrows of connection points, the one that points toward the spark gap, which side of the spark gap is it connected to?  If it is the diode side, then you are allowing a path across the diode, allowing a path reverse of the diode. Once the cap is charged and spark ceases to occur, when the transformer sec changes phase at some point, the cap voltage would add with the transformer output and provide a higher voltage across the gap than the transformer would produce by itself. That is if the arrow is pointing at the connection of the spark gap which connects to the diode. So yeah, there would be a different output across your connections than seen across the spark gap when it charged the cap. Near or on point of twice the voltage than the transformer output itself. So Id have to say that the effect of your output to your connections would definitely be different than the circuit would show on its own.

Yeah, would need to see your circuit and a clearer idea and imaging of what your are experiencing.

Thanks for showing

Mags


I rebuilt my setup so I can post a picture of the purple spark.  This partifular color is a mixture of blue and violet.  Or else it's not a mixture and lies right at the boundary between those colors.  I can see a purple right before violet, using a cd disc to difract sun light.  This color is called deep purple, because it lies deep in the rainbow's spectrum.

There was a lot of difficulty getting the effect with an oven diode.  And the diodes kept burning out besides.  So I went back to my vacuum tube rectifier and it worked alright.  A little experimenting showed the secondary spark will go to either spark gap electrode, as well as the arc, with the arc staying on regardless.  This is a clue that the spark gap in the circuit can be closed, with static still spreading from the open connection, with this spreading allowing the capacitor to keep being charged on an ongoing basis.  That together with the cap's internal leakage making room for more.  So the T-tap wire can be used to place static on something external to the circuit.  (Such as one side of a non grounded capacitor).

Advancing the utility and effectiveness of this circuit could start by using a full wave rectifier (four 1B3 tubes).  After that, combine two of the static outputs, with a DC offset.  (Eight rectifier tubes).  And I suspect static will keep spreading with oven diodes.  It's just that the spark is harder and more intense, with a lower frequency.

A primary difference between solid state and vacuum tubes is a momentary initial spark across the gap with a diode, but a weak, continuous spark with the tube.  Even without a spark in the spark gap, there will be when the higher potential jumper wire comes close.
   
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I dug out my Full Wave Valve Rectifier and verified that all of the filaments come on.  Ive currently got the 1B3 tubes wired in series, to handle 100,000 kV.  So I'll reconfigure the wiring, and figure out how to hook it up for the current project.

I also have a recently completed example circuit which shows an Electrical Conversion Board which operates with two small 1200 V. transformers.  The six diodes at the top of the circuit represent two back to back blocking diodes, at appropriate voltage.  These will provide half wave, voltage doubling rectification, based on my open connection circuit.  However, I finally realized that the two bridge rectifier assemblies, for simplicity, aren't needed for that.  If I want to use full wave advantage (using the Valves), I could just short  out the top diodes and it would still isolate the static energy.  And there might be a way to do it with two diodes per cap, to go ahead and test the circuit with two phase, single wire output from two caps.  (Since I only have four 1B3's at the moment).

As shown, there's a 25 ohm 25 Watt power resistor on the output.  If the output from that resistor is taken to ground, then the exotic-energy load can be placed across the resistor.  However, the output could instead be connected to one side of a car battery-driven capacitor.  (For 'instant' charging, at the circuit's voltage).  It all depends on the intended usage.
   
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Some amount of time considering how to wire up the basic circuit with a full wave rectifier revealed the only solution is to just start doing things, and see what happens.  This is with or without using the DC output.  In fact, the T spark will appear across various open connection points to the spark gap, using just AC connections to the four tube rectifier.

As far as the concept of the basic circuit, the most basic example is just a valve rectifier with a spark gap and jumper wire, without the external capacitor.  (I've used that a few times in the past, with various experiments).  Now that I have the full wave valve setup, that's producing the best effect on its own.  I'm getting more of an arc, rather than a spark.  And that's what I need.  Unfortunately, the inverter starts beeping, then goes into ground fault shutdown after a few seconds.  So that's another challenge.  And that's why I built one of these circuit's with small motor generators which don't need an inverter.  I just can't see where to put a spark gap.  I tried taking the open connection to a DC spark, and the effect was weak, without an arc like characteristic.

I may take what I've got and move to a different thread.  After I try my shape resonance effect.
   
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As is well known in the Alt Science community, when dealing with exotic energy or effects, pulses are needed.  Sometimes, it's recommended to interrupt the circuit on the low voltage side.  For instance, with some transformer applications.  Or, as with the current project, the LV input to the motor/generator.  Rather than take the time to make a fancy commutator, I'm just using a rotary switch.  The center track goes to the source, with all of the output pins connected.  I'll be using a battery drill to spin the switch, so I'll be able to adjust the speed at a critical point.  Or, I'll be able to leave a group of several pins open, if I want a pulse train followed by a space.  With 13 output pins around the switch, I should be able to get 5 to 6 kp/s, although 3 kp/s should be adequate.  I have produced the effect in the past with only a few pulses per second, but with much slower charge build up.
   
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Jerry
It sounds like your moving in the right direction.

I was thinking about running some more experiments this fall as well. I built a 30" 400kV Tesla coil and a Van De Graaff generator but my kids "donated" them to there high school science department which I was okay with. I now use smaller induction coils for experiments in the 5 to 30 kV range.

The majority of my experiments were running around 30kV input and I often used a 6" rotary interrupter disk similar to yours. It was a 6" plastic disk with 12 equally spaced holes drilled near the perimeter and 15mm long x 2mm pins inserted through the holes. It was driven by a brushless RC motor/esc using a servo controller to vary the speed. With a larger diameter interrupter disk we can switch and synchronize multiple circuit legs off one disk by using multiple electrode pairs around the perimeter.

I always had my best results with a variation on the Hubbard setup although the Cook coil setup was very interesting as well. I also looked at the Kapanadze/Ruslan setups but there far to complex and the tuning is a train wreck. In my opinion the older devices were superior because they had very few components and more meaningful literature.

In my opinion there is much more to be gained by looking at devices from the late 1800's to mid 1900's before all this general relativity/quantum mechanics nonsense took hold. Here the inventors often went into great detail to describe what they were looking for and why. More so, they had a lot more common sense than we tend to see today, lol.

Regards
AC





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Comprehend and Copy Nature... Viktor Schauberger

“Progress is impossible without change, and those who cannot change their minds cannot change anything.” George Bernard Shaw
   
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Thanks for the interesting comments, AC.  It's good to hear that you might start some experiments.

Here's at least some of what I'll be looking for, and, hopefully, working with:

Shape resonance (SR)
Self charging batteries
Brilliant one Watt illumination
Anagravitic shielding, with a possibility of SR propulsion
Time dilation
Glowing magnetism (between two coils)
Pulse based water splitting

These effects are not hundreds or thousands of years ahead of us; it's just that a different kind of energy is needed.  And that energy is what I'm dealing with.
   
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I've developed a tricky capacitor that some members might find interesting.  This is a key component of my Shape Resonance 'open connection' circuit.

It's common practice for me to make my hV caps out of sheet protectors and sheets of foil.  I like to stack three packs of dielectric, a piece of foil, then three more sheet protectors, etc.

Most of my caps have two layers of foil, with a value in the low nano Farads.  This particular component has twice as many layers.  These layers are stacked with connecting tabs coming out on alternating sides.  (Ultimately, two tabs on each side). The tabs should be a couple of inches wide, for low impeadance, and to prevent sheet-to-sheet shorting.  (Where two pieces of foil touch on the same side).

Once the stack is completed, with strips of shippping tape holding everything in place, I attach some 'hairpin' connecting electrodes.  These start as a couple pieces of wire with tight bends near one end.  These hairpin electrodes are then slipped over the stacked foil tabs, and crimped down.  The short end of a J electrode should come almost clear across the top tab, with the other end of the electrode wire extending far enough beyond the edge of the cap to facilitate connection.

The thing which makes this capacitor so tricky is that the connecting electrode wires have an inductive bend, and this causes the two sets of sheets to charge and discharge out of phase, producing a biphasic output into just one of the electrodes.
   
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Hello Jerry,

good stuff, really.

Can you please make an hand-drawing of your setup in the picture "Layout.jpg" ( your reply#10) with the T-tap..
T-Tap... I never heard that term ( I am a german  :-[). So a drawing would be helpful.
Thanks

Mike
   
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Hi Mike,

Here's the drawing.  I knew the wiring is hard to make out in the picture, so I should of had it up already.

The T-tap goes from the battery switch's red wire to the third spark gap electrode.  There's normally an open connection between this point and the arc in the gap.  The two point spark gap will work without this extra wire.  But the open connection has to be closed with the T-tap jumper wire to get the purple static.

This circuit will also work with a 1B3 Valve, as well as an oven diode.
   
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Thank you Jerry,

NST... is this a Neo-Transformer ? Voltage ?

I have a slow fireing device from an old electric-fence circuit. It can fire 3 to 12 Hz ( adjustable), 30 KV pulses using a flyback-transformer.
What would you suggest as a circuit-design if it ever makes sense at this low puls-rate. Rectifier needed ? I could give it a try.

Need to look up my stock of old tubes.

It could give some information about the vibrating static field ( if it is created with that low puls-rate) ...meaning: how long such a field remains.
What do you think ?

If I look at your circuit, here is another question: did you notice changes in power-consumption the moment the T-Tap-Arc appears ?
What happens at the 1.5 V Battery ? does it leak and dies after a certain amount of testing ?

I had an experience 10 years ago with leaking at the negative-terminal and successive total damage of the NiCd -Battery doing tests with just 2000 V in an circuit-design of Romero where high voltage was directed to the NiCd....can not remember though where I connected the high voltage.
Watch out for this.
One has to think about grounding the negative terminal of the 1.5 V and connect the T-Tap there to avoid damage if this is at all possible. I think it makes no difference if the T-Tap is connected there.
Have you tried this ?


Mike
« Last Edit: 2021-10-09, 00:46:45 by Kator01 »
   
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Hi Mike,

My neon sign transformer (NST) is putting out 30 miliAmps at 7.5 kV, end to end.  There will only be half that potential from one end to the center tap, which will still work.  In fact this circuit works very well using a MW oven transformer.  There isn't any purple, but it still has the hot biphasic energy.  With the MOT there's a lot more current, and a 10 gauge copper electrode from the T-tap will melt on the end, forming a bright red ball.

The pulse rate doesn't matter, since it will work with a single pulse.  The purple color is a high frequency effect on its own.  A diode, cap, and resistor can be used as a high frequency oscillator (the Testatica circuit uses that effect).  So the resistance of the spark gap comes into play.  But I have found that the color requires a certain number of miliAmps.  A fence charger normally puts out 4 mA, and this isn't enough to get the color.  But you might still get the T spark, and the associated static.  At that voltage, you'd need three Oven diodes, which are good for 15kV each, with these diodes placed in series.  It would be better if you could get a 1B3 tube.  (Look for something in your collection with a top hat electrode).

This circuit should not be grounded, unless you're transmitting power to a water pipe coming out of the ground in the yard.  (Kapanadze?)  Even then, you can't ground the negative as that would kill the spark gap.  And T-tapping it there would produce a redundant circuit branch, without the effect.  The static is only transmitted while the circuit is running.  However, when it's grounded to an isolated metal object, or one side of a capacitor, a residual static charge can build up.  So be careful with that.

That's a very good idea about checking the power draw, with and without the T spark.  I'm reluctant to take a chance, using my Watt meter.  Electronic components do not always hold up with this static energy.  Using my clamp meter to check the transformer's Amp draw would be another option.

And shunting across the diode doesn't prevent it from having something to conduct.  Think of it as a parallel resistance, splitting the current.  Also, I've been using that same battery, off and on, for a number of years, and it still reads 1.51V.  I don't see any corrosion, swelling, or leakage.  Although the negative from the cap contacts the battery, the return potential from the gap to the transformer doesn't.  So there isn't any hV actually across the battery - just the static floating on the circuit.  I've noticed in the past that a momentary biphasic spark next to an alkaline battery like this, in a wooden holder, will cause the battery to self charge, over a period of time.  It's possible that something similar is happening here.
« Last Edit: 2021-10-09, 15:00:43 by Jerry Volland »
   
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Just to make sure I'm providing accurate information, I tried using one end of the transformer to the center tap, and this does not work.  The output end of the spark gap apparently has to have an AC signal.  With some other straight hV transformer, two of them might be needed, with the primaries in anti parallel and the secondaries in series.  The center tap between the secondaries would not be used.

I also tried using a smaller cap, but this produced too much amp restriction.  By far the best effect, even with a silicone diode, comes from using a MW oven capacitor.  These are rated for 2100 Volts, but that's the AC value.  They'll actually hold at up to 10 kV, with DC.
   
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Jerry,

I was digging in the web today and found these two informations:

https://etheric.com/subquantum-kinetics/

The above would relate to antigrav-tech. There is also a short paragraph abput Kron`s
open circuit. Video is interesting.

Then this papaer by a russian author

https://www.researchgate.net/publication/313407243_GABRIEL_KRON'S_UNIVERSAL_ENGINEERING


Mike
   
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It looks like 'they' have declared all out war against me, and cancelled my Social Security payment.  Possibly (likely), the card number as well.

This circuit is the key.  Pulse frequency does matter. It works best with a beer sign transformer, at 28 kHz.  Push-pull ZVSs might work.
   
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A little over reaction here.  The Gov. does recognize my card number, and the deposit did come in.  It's just the bank's dial-in app to check my ballance doesn't recognize the ss number.  Probably the same old crap of my phone being hacked.

I'm still building.
   
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