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Author Topic: Simple Electrical Conversion Circuit  (Read 471 times)
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Gabriel Kron was a brilliant electrical pioneer.  As an engineer, he was regarded at the top of the group which was American born.  If we include Tesla, then Dr. Kron would be second on the list.  Unfortunately, he had an employer who sewed up all of his 'alternative' discoveries, into secrecy.

Gabriel Kron was also a Free Energy researcher.  He did claim results, but said the only clue he could provide is that there are points in every circuit between which exists an open connection.

It turns out that I've been researching a circuit like that on my own, which I'll describe in my next post, then present a more advanced version.
   
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Hello Jerry,

welcome to this forum.

I was digging a bit and found this website which lists almost all of his publication at the end, remarkable indeed, looking forward to what you will present

http://quantum-chemistry-history.com/Kron_Dat/KronGabriel1.htm

Who was this employer ?

Mike
   
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Thanks for the correct biographical information - I got mine from Bearden, iirc.  That site also mentioned he worked at GE.  As it is, your post is a good, solid addition to this area of the forum's data files.

This circuit I'm working with, in its simplest form, is just a hv transformer with a diode, cap, and a spark gap.  There are a variety of ways to wire up the four components, then test a jumper wire clipped between two components, to see if you can pull an additional spark at a different part of the circuit.  And this needs to happen without the spark gap going out.

For the conversion effect, the capacitor needs to come before the diode leading to the spark gap with the transformer's return wire.  The open connection is between the cap/diode junction and the center off the spark gap's arc.  (Off to the side).  The end of the jumper wire forms a third point with the spark gap, producing a second spark aimed perpendicular to the main arc.  This spark contains a different kind of energy, with unusual characteristics.
   
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Here are some example circuits, showing usable open connections.  Each of these circuits can be augmented by closing the open connections with an extra spark gap.  (No mater how small).  This will produce effects not normally available at the main gap.  The circuit I'm using is the third one, on the bottom left.  This circuit converts the transformer's inductive energy into some kind of vibrating static electricity.  This kind of energy is not a thousand years ahead of us.  It wouldn't take anywhere near that amount of time to develop related levels of technology, once the energy is known about.
   
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Here's an example of what this kind of energy looks like.  I've got two concentric grids, separated by Teflon.  The end of the jumper wire from the T tap connection is touching the outer grid.  There's a pale bluish/purple spark jumping from the jumper wire's contact point down to the inner grid, then on to the central electrode.   This spark is thin, pale, and hard to see, and that's becouse of the background lighting level.  In the sun shine, the same spark would be bright, deep purple, and thick and feathery, with the feather lines consisting of miniscule spheres streaming along.  So, when the spark interacts with light having the right spectrum, it forms quadric plasmons.

The second picture is even better because it shows the effect of placing a voltage gradient on a piece of charcoal.  A second, higher intensity discharge is pulled through the carbon - by the gradient - to the spark gap leading to the transformer's return wire.  This gradient is caused by charge coupling with the ends of the two grids, with differing potentials.  (How about using wire rings to couple the charge gradient to the carbon?  Driven by voltage multipliers?)

Looking at the bench layout, I do remember that I turned the diode tube around before these pictures.  That vacuum tube is a 1Q3 hv rectifier.  Similar to the common 1B3 valve, this one has a complete grid which spirals up to the top of the filament.  So, at a certain voltage and frequency, it can be used as a Farnsworth Tube.
   
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Jerry
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This circuit converts the transformer's inductive energy into some kind of vibrating static electricity.  This kind of energy is not a thousand years ahead of us.  It wouldn't take anywhere near that amount of time to develop related levels of technology, once the energy is known about.

I would agree and I can confirm the effects your talking about.

Most free energy inventors of the past also claimed to have seen these kinds of effects. My working theory is that matter is made of particles and fields already in motion. As such if an external force could couple to these internal motions then they could be manipulated. In effect were talking about modifying one property matter which ultimately effects other properties.

For example, we can take groups of observable particles like sand grains, Styrofoam balls etc. add HV fields and the particles can be attracted/repelled or levitated. So we know this effect works on the macro level and the next obvious step would be to try to apply it on the micro level.

I equate the basic effect with the Franklin Bell experiment. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Franklin_bells
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_E5gP7zdXgY

Regards
AC






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Comprehend and Copy Nature... Viktor Schauberger

“Progress is impossible without change, and those who cannot change their minds cannot change anything.” George Bernard Shaw
   
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Besides that, the energy produced by the circuit also has applications which don't require additional, external interaction.  For instance, it can be used for shape resonance.  A small, tapered alligator clip clipped to a transformer wire, with the clip's wire momentarily closing the open connection so that, after a few seconds, a heavy yellow spark shoots from the side of the alligator clip down to the wire it's clipped to.  A tiny, momentary, purple spark produces a heavy yellow static discharge.  I'll post that circuit a little later.  Maybe a video showing the time delay.

And with the charge pump effect picture, I just drilled the charcoal so it would slide onto the 1/8" ss electrode rod.  This rod has no connection, although it could.  There is no spark between the rods, without the 'pumped' spark at the top.  What WOULD Kirchoff say?  And is this a road to ou?
   

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Hey Jerry

In the bottom left circuit you say you are using,  when you power the transformer (AC), does the spark gap continuously spark? If the diode tube does not allow a reverse current, it would seem the spark would happen and then cease to continue once the cap gets fully charged, and the only way the cap would charge is if there was a spark.  Your arrows of connection points, the one that points toward the spark gap, which side of the spark gap is it connected to?  If it is the diode side, then you are allowing a path across the diode, allowing a path reverse of the diode. Once the cap is charged and spark ceases to occur, when the transformer sec changes phase at some point, the cap voltage would add with the transformer output and provide a higher voltage across the gap than the transformer would produce by itself. That is if the arrow is pointing at the connection of the spark gap which connects to the diode. So yeah, there would be a different output across your connections than seen across the spark gap when it charged the cap. Near or on point of twice the voltage than the transformer output itself. So Id have to say that the effect of your output to your connections would definitely be different than the circuit would show on its own.

Yeah, would need to see your circuit and a clearer idea and imaging of what your are experiencing.

Thanks for showing

Mags

   
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I'd like to take a minute right here, to share some very important cautionary information.  (Then I'll quote the preceding message).

The circuit with the T-tap going to the center of the arc produces NON-GROUNDING ENERGY.  Once the bicolor purple spark appears, vibrating static spreads out onto the entire circuit, its input/output wires, and any associated ground rod.  The NON-GROUNDING energy doesn't disappear at any of these points, but will spread underground throughout the entire neighborhood, in the form of 'stray voltage'.  The NON-GROUNDING stray voltage static impulses from your ground rod will also float on underground water.  This will electrify the water coming out of someone else's faucet or shower.  Even the landscape sprinkler water.  And operating the grounded circuit inside will also electrify a metal water pipe out in the yard.  (For power transmission).

The thing everyone has to keep in mind is DO NOT BUILD THIS CIRCUIT AND THEN JUST PLUG IT IN.  If you want to do it, it MUST be powered by a non grounded battery driven inverter.  And if you touch any metal on the battery, the wires, or the inverter, you'll not only feel a shock, but you'll also kill the inverter.  And the same goes for any electronics in your genset, if you go that route.

So be careful, expand your safety zone focus.  Don't shock someone's Pace Maker.
   
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Jerry
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The circuit with the T-tap going to the center of the arc produces NON-GROUNDING ENERGY.  Once the bicolor purple spark appears, vibrating static spreads out onto the entire circuit, its input/output wires, and any associated ground rod.  The NON-GROUNDING energy doesn't disappear at any of these points, but will spread underground throughout the entire neighborhood, in the form of 'stray voltage'.  The NON-GROUNDING stray voltage static impulses from your ground rod will also float on underground water.  This will electrify the water coming out of someone else's faucet or shower.  Even the landscape sprinkler water.  And operating the grounded circuit inside will also electrify a metal water pipe out in the yard.  (For power transmission).

I would agree and my (DC) Van De Graaff generator has a completely different nature than my (AC) Tesla coil.

Generally speaking a HV AC source charges something (+) for a period then cancels said (+) charge with a (-) charge cycle. Where a HV DC source can keep adding (+) or (-) charges which disperse outward to objects and the environment. There are also instances where HV generators only output one polarity. That is the charging effect was not equal and opposite and these devices were considered uni-polar generators.

So there's a lot going on we still don't fully understand...

Regards
AC


---------------------------
Comprehend and Copy Nature... Viktor Schauberger

“Progress is impossible without change, and those who cannot change their minds cannot change anything.” George Bernard Shaw
   
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